Martinsburg

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What our patients are saying about us:
“If you ever need a good therapist, Rankin Physical Therapy is the place to go. I had a fractured hip, extremely bad leg pain, and I could not put any pressure on my leg. My therapist worked on my leg and in a short time I was walking without the walker. Now I am 100 percent better. Thank you Rankin Physical Therapy in Martinsburg”!
Mary
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What our patients are saying about us:
“If you ever need a good therapist, Rankin Physical Therapy is the place to go. I had a fractured hip, extremely bad leg pain, and I could not put any pressure on my leg. My therapist worked on my leg and in a short time I was walking without the walker.  Now I am 100 percent better. Thank you Rankin Physical Therapy in Martinsburg”!
Mary

Updated list of restaurants doing food delivery. Please add what you have. Thanks ... See MoreSee Less

Updated list of restaurants doing food delivery. Please add what you have. Thanks

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center:
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center:
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123

"A positive mind is a powerful weapon."
- Dr. Partha Nandi

Rankin Physical Therapy
Berkeley Springs 304.258.1300
Hedgesville 304.754.6000
Inwood 304.229.1010
Martinsburg 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown 301.790.0202
Spring Mills 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

A positive mind is a powerful weapon. 
- Dr. Partha Nandi  

Rankin Physical Therapy
Berkeley Springs        304.258.1300
Hedgesville                 304.754.6000
Inwood                         304.229.1010
Martinsburg                304.267.0866
North Hagerstown     301.790.9999
Shepherdstown          304.876.1000
South Hagerstown     301.790.0202
Spring Mills                 304.274.0123

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For how long?!

Martinsburg Bulldogs are Sectional Champions! ... See MoreSee Less

Martinsburg Bulldogs are Sectional Champions!

Look at those temps over the next 7 days!
This Week's Forecast
DAY TEMP
FRI 52° 35°
SAT 51° 28°
SUN 64° 34°
MON 71° 45°
TUE 66° 40°
WED 61° 40°
THU 59° 41°
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Look at those temps over the next 7 days!
This Weeks Forecast
DAY              TEMP
FRI                52° 35°
SAT               51° 28°
SUN              64° 34°
MON             71° 45°
TUE               66° 40°
WED              61° 40°
THU              59° 41°

Happy Leap Year Day - it’s an extra day in the year... make it count! ... See MoreSee Less

Happy Leap Year Day - it’s an extra day in the year... make it count!

LaurenSpringwood Hospitality is building a brand NEW Home2 Suites by Hilton in Martinsburg and we are now hiring for a General Manager!! If you have interest in running this beautiful hotel please apply @ SPRINGWOODJOBS.COM ... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy - Martinsburg
302 Rock Cliff Dr.
(304) 267-0866
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy - Martinsburg
302 Rock Cliff Dr.
(304) 267-0866

Judge rules in favor of Martinsburg firefighters in holiday pay lawsuit
By Matthew Umstead mumstead@herald-mail.com
Published Tue Feb 25, 2020 8:30 PM EST
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. — A lawsuit that claims Martinsburg firefighters weren’t properly paid for holidays continues in Berkeley County Circuit Court, but a circuit judge ruled Tuesday that state law backs at least part of the compensation-related claims by the group of current and retired city firefighters. In a series of rulings, 23rd Judicial Circuit Judge Laura Faircloth granted summary judgment in favor of the approximately three dozen firefighters’ claims regarding holiday pay. The lawsuit, which was filed in June 2018, contends the city not only violated the West Virginia Wage Payment and Collection Act, but alleges that the city’s now-former fire chief retaliated against the firefighters for filing the civil action, at least in part, by instituting a “sick-time” policy that doesn’t apply to any other group of city employees. Exactly what the city could be expected to pay the firefighters as a result of the judge’s ruling Tuesday is unclear. Besides the holiday-pay issue, Faircloth also ruled that additional testimony and information is needed to rule on claims of retaliation and salary adjustments, denying the firefighters’ motion for summary judgment on those matters. In ruling in their favor on the holiday-pay issue, Faircloth quoted a section of West Virginia code regarding how firefighters should be compensated for legal holidays, noting that the employees are allowed to have equal time off or be paid at a rate not less than 1 1/2 times the employees’ rate of pay. That compensation, according to the law, either can take the form of 24 hours of comp time or 36 hours of pay, Wheeling attorney Teresa Toriseva told the judge Tuesday in presenting the firefighters’ arguments. Toriseva pointed to deposition testimony indicating that the manner in which the firefighters were compensated was in effect for 29 years before being corrected by the city. The attorney also told Faircloth that the firefighters, who are members of IAFF Local 805, are seeking to recoup holiday pay dating back 10 years, noting a statute of limitations involving written contracts. The lawsuit also asks the court to impose punitive damages and seeks injunctive relief through an order staying the implementation of the “sick-time” policy and a holiday-pay ordinance adopted in September 2018, shortly after the firefighters filed their civil complaint in circuit court. City Attorney Kin Sayre, who disputed the retaliation claims in court Tuesday, told Faircloth that he didn’t know why the compensation arrangement for firefighters was put into effect years ago, but noted that the city’s firefighters apparently wanted to receive an equal paycheck from pay period to pay period. Career firefighters’ schedules typically require longer work shifts and overtime pay. According to the lawsuit, Martinsburg firefighters are paid 53 hours of regular time and three hours of overtime each week, but the firefighters also have claimed that the city has not been paying its firefighters for all of the hours actually worked in a pay period and instead were paying them “on the average.” Toriseva told the judge Tuesday that she has been involved with similar claims by paid firefighters in a number of other West Virginia cities, including Huntington, Morgantown and Parkersburg. Morgantown city leaders adopted a resolution last week to address the compensation issue in question for firefighters through the end of 2020 while litigation is pending there, Toriseva said. A $1.7 million agreement to resolve back-pay compensation issues with firefighters in Charleston also was announced in January by Amy Shuler Goodwin, the city’s mayor.
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Judge rules in favor of Martinsburg firefighters in holiday pay lawsuit
By Matthew Umstead mumstead@herald-mail.com
Published Tue Feb 25, 2020 8:30 PM EST
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. — A lawsuit that claims Martinsburg firefighters weren’t properly paid for holidays continues in Berkeley County Circuit Court, but a circuit judge ruled Tuesday that state law backs at least part of the compensation-related claims by the group of current and retired city firefighters. In a series of rulings, 23rd Judicial Circuit Judge Laura Faircloth granted summary judgment in favor of the approximately three dozen firefighters’ claims regarding holiday pay. The lawsuit, which was filed in June 2018, contends the city not only violated the West Virginia Wage Payment and Collection Act, but alleges that the city’s now-former fire chief retaliated against the firefighters for filing the civil action, at least in part, by instituting a “sick-time” policy that doesn’t apply to any other group of city employees. Exactly what the city could be expected to pay the firefighters as a result of the judge’s ruling Tuesday is unclear. Besides the holiday-pay issue, Faircloth also ruled that additional testimony and information is needed to rule on claims of retaliation and salary adjustments, denying the firefighters’ motion for summary judgment on those matters. In ruling in their favor on the holiday-pay issue, Faircloth quoted a section of West Virginia code regarding how firefighters should be compensated for legal holidays, noting that the employees are allowed to have equal time off or be paid at a rate not less than 1 1/2 times the employees’ rate of pay. That compensation, according to the law, either can take the form of 24 hours of comp time or 36 hours of pay, Wheeling attorney Teresa Toriseva told the judge Tuesday in presenting the firefighters’ arguments. Toriseva pointed to deposition testimony indicating that the manner in which the firefighters were compensated was in effect for 29 years before being corrected by the city. The attorney also told Faircloth that the firefighters, who are members of IAFF Local 805, are seeking to recoup holiday pay dating back 10 years, noting a statute of limitations involving written contracts. The lawsuit also asks the court to impose punitive damages and seeks injunctive relief through an order staying the implementation of the “sick-time” policy and a holiday-pay ordinance adopted in September 2018, shortly after the firefighters filed their civil complaint in circuit court. City Attorney Kin Sayre, who disputed the retaliation claims in court Tuesday, told Faircloth that he didn’t know why the compensation arrangement for firefighters was put into effect years ago, but noted that the city’s firefighters apparently wanted to receive an equal paycheck from pay period to pay period. Career firefighters’ schedules typically require longer work shifts and overtime pay. According to the lawsuit, Martinsburg firefighters are paid 53 hours of regular time and three hours of overtime each week, but the firefighters also have claimed that the city has not been paying its firefighters for all of the hours actually worked in a pay period and instead were paying them “on the average.” Toriseva told the judge Tuesday that she has been involved with similar claims by paid firefighters in a number of other West Virginia cities, including Huntington, Morgantown and Parkersburg. Morgantown city leaders adopted a resolution last week to address the compensation issue in question for firefighters through the end of 2020 while litigation is pending there, Toriseva said. A $1.7 million agreement to resolve back-pay compensation issues with firefighters in Charleston also was announced in January by Amy Shuler Goodwin, the city’s mayor.

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness
Berkeley Springs 304.258.1300
Hedgesville 304.754.6000
Inwood 304.229.1010
Martinsburg 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown 301.790.0202
Spring Mills 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness
Berkeley Springs        304.258.1300
Hedgesville                 304.754.6000
Inwood                         304.229.1010
Martinsburg                304.267.0866
North Hagerstown     301.790.9999
Shepherdstown          304.876.1000
South Hagerstown     301.790.0202
Spring Mills                 304.274.0123

America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic. Consider that in 2012 alone, health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid pain medication, enough for every American adult to have their own bottle of pills.

Opioids, responsibly dosed, are an appropriate part of medical treatment in some situations. But they carry significant risks, including depression, withdrawal symptoms, overdose, and addiction. The statistics are scary:

As many as 1 in 4 people who receive prescription opioids long-term for noncancer pain struggle with addiction. Every day, more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for misusing prescription opioids;
People who are addicted to prescription opioids are 40 times more likely to become addicted to heroin; and 78 people die every day from an opioid-related overdose.

To address this national health crisis, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued guidelines in March 2016 urging providers to reduce opioid prescribing in favor of safe, nondrug alternatives such as physical therapy for chronic pain conditions, including low back pain, hip and knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia. In August 2016, the Surgeon General sent a letter to every physician in the country asking for their help to solve the problem.

Meanwhile, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) launched a national public awareness campaign to educate consumers about the risks of opioids and the safe alternative of physical therapy for pain management.

A safe way to manage and treat pain

Physical therapists treat pain and improve function through movement and exercise without the risky side effects of opioids. A physical therapist's individualized, hands-on approach engages the patient, making her or him an active participant in her or his own recovery.

Patients should choose physical therapist treatment instead of opioids when...

The risks of opioids outweigh the rewards. CDC experts say that opioids should not be considered as first-line or routine therapy for chronic pain. Even when opioids are prescribed, the CDC recommends that patients receive "the lowest effective dosage," and opioids "should be combined" with nonopioid therapies, such as physical therapy.

Pain or function problems are related to low back pain, hip or knee osteoarthritis, or fibromyalgia. The CDC cites "high-quality evidence" supporting exercise as part of a physical therapist treatment plan for these chronic pain conditions.

Pain lasts at least 90 days. At this point, pain is considered "chronic," and the risks for continued opioid use increase. The CDC says that "clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient."

APTA's #ChoosePT initiative is raising awareness about the dangers of prescription opioids and the safe, nondrug alternative for pain management provided by physical therapists. Visit MoveForwardPT.com for information to help you decide if physical therapist treatment is right for you.
... See MoreSee Less

America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic. Consider that in 2012 alone, health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid pain medication, enough for every American adult to have their own bottle of pills.

Opioids, responsibly dosed, are an appropriate part of medical treatment in some situations. But they carry significant risks, including depression, withdrawal symptoms, overdose, and addiction. The statistics are scary:

As many as 1 in 4 people who receive prescription opioids long-term for noncancer pain struggle with addiction.  Every day, more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for misusing prescription opioids;
People who are addicted to prescription opioids are 40 times more likely to become addicted to heroin; and 78 people die every day from an opioid-related overdose.

To address this national health crisis, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued guidelines in March 2016 urging providers to reduce opioid prescribing in favor of safe, nondrug alternatives such as physical therapy for chronic pain conditions, including low back pain, hip and knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia. In August 2016, the Surgeon General sent a letter to every physician in the country asking for their help to solve the problem.

Meanwhile, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) launched a national public awareness campaign to educate consumers about the risks of opioids and the safe alternative of physical therapy for pain management.

A safe way to manage and treat pain

Physical therapists treat pain and improve function through movement and exercise without the risky side effects of opioids. A physical therapists individualized, hands-on approach engages the patient, making her or him an active participant in her or his own recovery.

Patients should choose physical therapist treatment instead of opioids when...

The risks of opioids outweigh the rewards. CDC experts say that opioids should not be considered as first-line or routine therapy for chronic pain. Even when opioids are prescribed, the CDC recommends that patients receive the lowest effective dosage, and opioids should be combined with nonopioid therapies, such as physical therapy.

Pain or function problems are related to low back pain, hip or knee osteoarthritis, or fibromyalgia. The CDC cites high-quality evidence supporting exercise as part of a physical therapist treatment plan for these chronic pain conditions.

Pain lasts at least 90 days. At this point, pain is considered chronic, and the risks for continued opioid use increase. The CDC says that clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient.

APTAs #ChoosePT initiative is raising awareness about the dangers of prescription opioids and the safe, nondrug alternative for pain management provided by physical therapists. Visit http://MoveForwardPT.com for information to help you decide if physical therapist treatment is right for you.

Former W.Va. School Service Personnel Association leader announces bid for Berkeley County BOE
By Matthew Umstead mumstead@herald-mail.com
Published Fri Feb 14, 2020 7:52 PM EST
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. — Jackee Long, a former president of the West Virginia School Service Personnel Association, announced her candidacy for the Berkeley County Board of Education on Friday.

“I believe I can bring positive, impactful change to the Berkeley County Board of Education,” Long said in a news release.

“My extensive knowledge of the budget process, the certified list, West Virginia Code, and the West Virginia Department of Education and Berkeley County Schools Policies and Procedures ensure that I am qualified for the position.”

Elected to four-year terms, board of education members may receive up to $160 per meeting attended, but may not receive pay for more than 50 meetings in any one fiscal year, according to state code. The fiscal year begins July 1, when board members' terms of office begin.

Long of Martinsburg, is among nine candidates who are vying for two seats on the Berkeley County school board in the May 12 primary election, according to the West Virginia Secretary of State's office.

Dewey Largent of Bunker Hill, W.Va., Valerie Ledford of Kearneysville, Michael Martin of Martinsburg, Tiffany Wallech of Hedgesville, W.Va., Christian Waskow of Inwood, W.Va., Nathaniel Wright of Martinsburg, and incumbents Michelle Barnes-Russell and William "Bill" Queen, both of Martinsburg, also have filed for school board in the nonpartisan contest.

Long, who retired from Berkeley County Schools in 2014 after 40 years of service, said she served as the state president of the school service personnel union organization for 12 years and served as the county president of the association for 20 years.

In her career, Long said she held strong to the WVSSPA motto “We Serve Children” during her career and was dedicated to ensuring that students, education employees, parents and all concerned are treated with dignity and respect.

Long said she also adhered to an ultimate goal of following the code and policies and procedures in every position she has held.

Long also noted the importance of students, parents, education employees, administration, school board members and the community "working as a team to bring trust back to the system."

“No student should be abused, harassed, bullied or intimidated," Long said.

"At the same time, no educational employee should be abused, harassed, bullied or intimidated, nor should they be scared to death to discipline a student, within the limits permitted, because of repercussions. When this occurs chaos also occurs in the system.”

Long said she feels strongly about increasing mental health services provided to Berkeley County Schools’ students. “Lack of these services limit student growth and potential. Educators can identify the red flags but without proper funding for services their hands are tied,” Long said.
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Former W.Va. School Service Personnel Association leader announces bid for Berkeley County BOE
By Matthew Umstead mumstead@herald-mail.com
Published Fri Feb 14, 2020 7:52 PM EST
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. — Jackee Long, a former president of the West Virginia School Service Personnel Association, announced her candidacy for the Berkeley County Board of Education on Friday.

“I believe I can bring positive, impactful change to the Berkeley County Board of Education,” Long said in a news release.

“My extensive knowledge of the budget process, the certified list, West Virginia Code, and the West Virginia Department of Education and Berkeley County Schools Policies and Procedures ensure that I am qualified for the position.”

Elected to four-year terms, board of education members may receive up to $160 per meeting attended, but may not receive pay for more than 50 meetings in any one fiscal year, according to state code. The fiscal year begins July 1, when board members terms of office begin.

Long of Martinsburg, is among nine candidates who are vying for two seats on the Berkeley County school board in the May 12 primary election, according to the West Virginia Secretary of States office. 

Dewey Largent of Bunker Hill, W.Va., Valerie Ledford of Kearneysville,  Michael Martin of Martinsburg, Tiffany Wallech of Hedgesville, W.Va., Christian Waskow of Inwood, W.Va., Nathaniel Wright of Martinsburg, and incumbents Michelle Barnes-Russell and William Bill Queen, both of Martinsburg, also have filed for school board in the nonpartisan contest.

Long, who retired from Berkeley County Schools in 2014 after 40 years of service, said she served as the state president of the school service personnel union organization for 12 years and served as the county president of the association for 20 years. 

In her career, Long said she held strong to the WVSSPA motto “We Serve Children” during her career and was dedicated to ensuring that students, education employees, parents and all concerned are treated with dignity and respect.

Long said she also adhered to an ultimate goal of following the code and policies and procedures in every position she has held.

Long also noted the importance of students, parents, education employees, administration, school board members and the community working as a team to bring trust back to the system.

“No student should be abused, harassed, bullied or intimidated, Long said.

At the same time, no educational employee should be abused, harassed, bullied or intimidated, nor should they be scared to death to discipline a student, within the limits permitted, because of repercussions. When this occurs chaos also occurs in the system.”

Long said she feels strongly about increasing mental health services provided to Berkeley County Schools’ students. “Lack of these services limit student growth and potential. Educators can identify the red flags but without proper funding for services their hands are tied,” Long said.

Rankin Physical Therapy has 6 tickets to give away to the men’s and women’s games tomorrow evening (Wednesday) at the Butcher Center. The Women’s Game is at 530pm followed by the Men’s game. Tickets are good for both games. If you would like to go, all you have to do is like one of our clinic FB pages & let me know. GO RAMS! 🏀 ... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy has 6 tickets to give away to the men’s and women’s games tomorrow evening (Wednesday) at the Butcher Center.  The Women’s Game is at 530pm followed by the Men’s game. Tickets are good for both games.  If you would like to go, all you have to do is like one of our clinic FB pages & let me know. GO RAMS! 🏀

What our patients are saying about us.

My experience with Rankin Physical Therapy has been excellent. In the past year, I've had 2 knee replacements. Both times I did my physical therapy at Rankin Physical Therapy - once in Martinsburg and once in Inwood. Both times, I walked in with a cane and after 4 weeks and 5 weeks I was walking on my own with a skip in my step. Everyone there is very kind and understanding. I would highly recommend Rankin Physical Therapy to all of my friends and family. They are great, they get the job done, and I was even sad when I graduated.
Alice
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What our patients are saying about us.

My experience with Rankin Physical Therapy has been excellent. In the past year, Ive had 2 knee replacements. Both times I did my physical therapy at Rankin Physical Therapy - once in Martinsburg and once in Inwood.  Both times, I walked in with a cane and after 4 weeks and 5 weeks I was walking on my own with a skip in my step. Everyone there is very kind and understanding. I would highly recommend Rankin Physical Therapy to all of my friends and family.  They are great, they get the job done, and I was even sad when I graduated.
Alice

“Enjoy the little things in life, for one day you may look back and realize they were the big things.”
—Robert Brault (born 1938)
American Writer
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Free Consultations (301)991-9934
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