Martinsburg

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America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic. Consider that in 2012 alone, health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid pain medication, enough for every American adult to have their own bottle of pills.

Opioids, responsibly dosed, are an appropriate part of medical treatment in some situations. But they carry significant risks, including depression, withdrawal symptoms, overdose, and addiction. The statistics are scary:

As many as 1 in 4 people who receive prescription opioids long-term for noncancer pain struggle with addiction. Every day, more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for misusing prescription opioids;
People who are addicted to prescription opioids are 40 times more likely to become addicted to heroin; and 78 people die every day from an opioid-related overdose.

To address this national health crisis, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued guidelines in March 2016 urging providers to reduce opioid prescribing in favor of safe, nondrug alternatives such as physical therapy for chronic pain conditions, including low back pain, hip and knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia. In August 2016, the Surgeon General sent a letter to every physician in the country asking for their help to solve the problem.

Meanwhile, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) launched a national public awareness campaign to educate consumers about the risks of opioids and the safe alternative of physical therapy for pain management.

A safe way to manage and treat pain

Physical therapists treat pain and improve function through movement and exercise without the risky side effects of opioids. A physical therapist's individualized, hands-on approach engages the patient, making her or him an active participant in her or his own recovery.

Patients should choose physical therapist treatment instead of opioids when...

The risks of opioids outweigh the rewards. CDC experts say that opioids should not be considered as first-line or routine therapy for chronic pain. Even when opioids are prescribed, the CDC recommends that patients receive "the lowest effective dosage," and opioids "should be combined" with nonopioid therapies, such as physical therapy.

Pain or function problems are related to low back pain, hip or knee osteoarthritis, or fibromyalgia. The CDC cites "high-quality evidence" supporting exercise as part of a physical therapist treatment plan for these chronic pain conditions.

Pain lasts at least 90 days. At this point, pain is considered "chronic," and the risks for continued opioid use increase. The CDC says that "clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient."

APTA's #ChoosePT initiative is raising awareness about the dangers of prescription opioids and the safe, nondrug alternative for pain management provided by physical therapists. Visit MoveForwardPT.com for information to help you decide if physical therapist treatment is right for you.
... See MoreSee Less

America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic. Consider that in 2012 alone, health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid pain medication, enough for every American adult to have their own bottle of pills.

Opioids, responsibly dosed, are an appropriate part of medical treatment in some situations. But they carry significant risks, including depression, withdrawal symptoms, overdose, and addiction. The statistics are scary:

As many as 1 in 4 people who receive prescription opioids long-term for noncancer pain struggle with addiction.  Every day, more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for misusing prescription opioids;
People who are addicted to prescription opioids are 40 times more likely to become addicted to heroin; and 78 people die every day from an opioid-related overdose.

To address this national health crisis, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued guidelines in March 2016 urging providers to reduce opioid prescribing in favor of safe, nondrug alternatives such as physical therapy for chronic pain conditions, including low back pain, hip and knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia. In August 2016, the Surgeon General sent a letter to every physician in the country asking for their help to solve the problem.

Meanwhile, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) launched a national public awareness campaign to educate consumers about the risks of opioids and the safe alternative of physical therapy for pain management.

A safe way to manage and treat pain

Physical therapists treat pain and improve function through movement and exercise without the risky side effects of opioids. A physical therapists individualized, hands-on approach engages the patient, making her or him an active participant in her or his own recovery.

Patients should choose physical therapist treatment instead of opioids when...

The risks of opioids outweigh the rewards. CDC experts say that opioids should not be considered as first-line or routine therapy for chronic pain. Even when opioids are prescribed, the CDC recommends that patients receive the lowest effective dosage, and opioids should be combined with nonopioid therapies, such as physical therapy.

Pain or function problems are related to low back pain, hip or knee osteoarthritis, or fibromyalgia. The CDC cites high-quality evidence supporting exercise as part of a physical therapist treatment plan for these chronic pain conditions.

Pain lasts at least 90 days. At this point, pain is considered chronic, and the risks for continued opioid use increase. The CDC says that clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient.

APTAs #ChoosePT initiative is raising awareness about the dangers of prescription opioids and the safe, nondrug alternative for pain management provided by physical therapists. Visit http://MoveForwardPT.com for information to help you decide if physical therapist treatment is right for you.

Former W.Va. School Service Personnel Association leader announces bid for Berkeley County BOE
By Matthew Umstead mumstead@herald-mail.com
Published Fri Feb 14, 2020 7:52 PM EST
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. — Jackee Long, a former president of the West Virginia School Service Personnel Association, announced her candidacy for the Berkeley County Board of Education on Friday.

“I believe I can bring positive, impactful change to the Berkeley County Board of Education,” Long said in a news release.

“My extensive knowledge of the budget process, the certified list, West Virginia Code, and the West Virginia Department of Education and Berkeley County Schools Policies and Procedures ensure that I am qualified for the position.”

Elected to four-year terms, board of education members may receive up to $160 per meeting attended, but may not receive pay for more than 50 meetings in any one fiscal year, according to state code. The fiscal year begins July 1, when board members' terms of office begin.

Long of Martinsburg, is among nine candidates who are vying for two seats on the Berkeley County school board in the May 12 primary election, according to the West Virginia Secretary of State's office.

Dewey Largent of Bunker Hill, W.Va., Valerie Ledford of Kearneysville, Michael Martin of Martinsburg, Tiffany Wallech of Hedgesville, W.Va., Christian Waskow of Inwood, W.Va., Nathaniel Wright of Martinsburg, and incumbents Michelle Barnes-Russell and William "Bill" Queen, both of Martinsburg, also have filed for school board in the nonpartisan contest.

Long, who retired from Berkeley County Schools in 2014 after 40 years of service, said she served as the state president of the school service personnel union organization for 12 years and served as the county president of the association for 20 years.

In her career, Long said she held strong to the WVSSPA motto “We Serve Children” during her career and was dedicated to ensuring that students, education employees, parents and all concerned are treated with dignity and respect.

Long said she also adhered to an ultimate goal of following the code and policies and procedures in every position she has held.

Long also noted the importance of students, parents, education employees, administration, school board members and the community "working as a team to bring trust back to the system."

“No student should be abused, harassed, bullied or intimidated," Long said.

"At the same time, no educational employee should be abused, harassed, bullied or intimidated, nor should they be scared to death to discipline a student, within the limits permitted, because of repercussions. When this occurs chaos also occurs in the system.”

Long said she feels strongly about increasing mental health services provided to Berkeley County Schools’ students. “Lack of these services limit student growth and potential. Educators can identify the red flags but without proper funding for services their hands are tied,” Long said.
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Former W.Va. School Service Personnel Association leader announces bid for Berkeley County BOE
By Matthew Umstead mumstead@herald-mail.com
Published Fri Feb 14, 2020 7:52 PM EST
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. — Jackee Long, a former president of the West Virginia School Service Personnel Association, announced her candidacy for the Berkeley County Board of Education on Friday.

“I believe I can bring positive, impactful change to the Berkeley County Board of Education,” Long said in a news release.

“My extensive knowledge of the budget process, the certified list, West Virginia Code, and the West Virginia Department of Education and Berkeley County Schools Policies and Procedures ensure that I am qualified for the position.”

Elected to four-year terms, board of education members may receive up to $160 per meeting attended, but may not receive pay for more than 50 meetings in any one fiscal year, according to state code. The fiscal year begins July 1, when board members terms of office begin.

Long of Martinsburg, is among nine candidates who are vying for two seats on the Berkeley County school board in the May 12 primary election, according to the West Virginia Secretary of States office. 

Dewey Largent of Bunker Hill, W.Va., Valerie Ledford of Kearneysville,  Michael Martin of Martinsburg, Tiffany Wallech of Hedgesville, W.Va., Christian Waskow of Inwood, W.Va., Nathaniel Wright of Martinsburg, and incumbents Michelle Barnes-Russell and William Bill Queen, both of Martinsburg, also have filed for school board in the nonpartisan contest.

Long, who retired from Berkeley County Schools in 2014 after 40 years of service, said she served as the state president of the school service personnel union organization for 12 years and served as the county president of the association for 20 years. 

In her career, Long said she held strong to the WVSSPA motto “We Serve Children” during her career and was dedicated to ensuring that students, education employees, parents and all concerned are treated with dignity and respect.

Long said she also adhered to an ultimate goal of following the code and policies and procedures in every position she has held.

Long also noted the importance of students, parents, education employees, administration, school board members and the community working as a team to bring trust back to the system.

“No student should be abused, harassed, bullied or intimidated, Long said.

At the same time, no educational employee should be abused, harassed, bullied or intimidated, nor should they be scared to death to discipline a student, within the limits permitted, because of repercussions. When this occurs chaos also occurs in the system.”

Long said she feels strongly about increasing mental health services provided to Berkeley County Schools’ students. “Lack of these services limit student growth and potential. Educators can identify the red flags but without proper funding for services their hands are tied,” Long said.

Rankin Physical Therapy has 6 tickets to give away to the men’s and women’s games tomorrow evening (Wednesday) at the Butcher Center. The Women’s Game is at 530pm followed by the Men’s game. Tickets are good for both games. If you would like to go, all you have to do is like one of our clinic FB pages & let me know. GO RAMS! 🏀 ... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy has 6 tickets to give away to the men’s and women’s games tomorrow evening (Wednesday) at the Butcher Center.  The Women’s Game is at 530pm followed by the Men’s game. Tickets are good for both games.  If you would like to go, all you have to do is like one of our clinic FB pages & let me know. GO RAMS! 🏀

What our patients are saying about us.

My experience with Rankin Physical Therapy has been excellent. In the past year, I've had 2 knee replacements. Both times I did my physical therapy at Rankin Physical Therapy - once in Martinsburg and once in Inwood. Both times, I walked in with a cane and after 4 weeks and 5 weeks I was walking on my own with a skip in my step. Everyone there is very kind and understanding. I would highly recommend Rankin Physical Therapy to all of my friends and family. They are great, they get the job done, and I was even sad when I graduated.
Alice
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What our patients are saying about us.

My experience with Rankin Physical Therapy has been excellent. In the past year, Ive had 2 knee replacements. Both times I did my physical therapy at Rankin Physical Therapy - once in Martinsburg and once in Inwood.  Both times, I walked in with a cane and after 4 weeks and 5 weeks I was walking on my own with a skip in my step. Everyone there is very kind and understanding. I would highly recommend Rankin Physical Therapy to all of my friends and family.  They are great, they get the job done, and I was even sad when I graduated.
Alice

“Enjoy the little things in life, for one day you may look back and realize they were the big things.”
—Robert Brault (born 1938)
American Writer
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3 weeks ago

Martinsburg, West Virginia

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Bill targeting 2018 W.Va. candidate residency controversy halted
By Matthew Umstead mumstead@herald-mail.com
Published Mon Jan 20, 2020 6:30 PM EST
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. — Legislative action on a bill that aims to strengthen residency requirements for candidates for state or local elections in West Virginia was halted Monday by leadership in the House of Delegates. House Bill 4096, which was up for final consideration Monday in the 100-seat House, was moved to the inactive house calendar by the powerful House Rules Committee just before the start of the floor session. Del. Larry D. Kump, R-Berkeley/Morgan, the bill’s lead sponsor, said in a telephone interview that the move to take the bill off the special calendar was concerning, but noted that he wasn’t panicked about the bill’s fate. Kump, along with Rules Committee members Del. Jason Barrett, D-Berkeley, and Del. Eric Householder, R-Berkeley, said they weren’t told why action was halted on the bill. Monday was the 13th day of the West Virginia Legislature’s regular 60-day session. Kump said the introduction of HB 4096 stems from a residency controversy involving Tally Reed, Kump’s opponent in the 2018 GOP primary election in the 59th House District. If adopted, HB 4096 would add a new section to state code requiring candidates to reside in the district they seek to represent. The bill includes a definition for “principal residence” to mean the place where the candidate lives, including both physical residency and an intent to remain in the state, district, county or municipality. In 2018, a couple of 59th District residents filed legal action in court, seeking a declaration that Reed was ineligible for the election due, in part, to the one-year residency requirement in the West Virginia Constitution. Reed disputed the residency claims as a politically motivated distraction to voters. The constitution prohibits individuals from serving as state senators or delegates if they haven’t been a resident within the district or county from which they are elected for one year before the candidate’s election. The residents who challenged Reed’s eligibility cited more than a dozen exhibits in their petition, including property records, voting history and campaign materials linking the candidate to a Berkeley Springs residence in the neighboring 58th District. While Reed’s certificate of candidacy announcement filed Jan. 25, 2018, with the secretary of state’s office indicated her home address was 11348 Martinsburg Road in Hedgesville, the address listed on Reed’s voter registration before Jan. 3, 2018, was 4253 Martinsburg Road in Berkeley Springs, according to information obtained from the secretary of state’s office and the petition. Kump, who defeated Reed in the May 2018 primary election, faces opposition in this May’s Republican primary by Reed’s husband, Ken Reed. In determining residency, the new code section proposed in HB 4096 states facts that might demonstrate the principal residence of a person may include: • The physical character of the person’s residence • Time spent at the residence • A candidate’s reasons for residency • Whether the person intends on returning permanently to another residence outside of the jurisdiction in the future • Whether the person obtains a license to operate a vehicle in the state • Whether the person registers a vehicle or other property at that address • Addresses listed on the person’s vehicle and voter-registration cards and driver’s license • The address where a person receives state or federal benefits • Where the person pays property or income taxes.
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Are falls preventable?
Most falls result from a number of risk factors including changes in your body that increase your risk for a fall, things we do or don’t do that increase our fall risk, and hazards in our home or community.

In order to prevent falls you can exercise to improve your strength and balance, have your doctor review your medicines, have your vision checked, and make your home safer.

When starting an exercise program talk to your doctor and make sure classes are for your age group and or ability level. Identify and eliminate fall hazards in your home. Medications may cause side effects that make you dizzy and increase your fall risk. Be sure you can read your labels and ask for an annual medication review. Ask for annual eye exam after the age of 50. Multifocal lenses may blur or distort your vision looking down, also increasing your fall risk. Check your blood pressure regularly, if you get dizzy when you stand up see your doctor and have them look at your blood pressure medication as it could relate to a fall risk.
Rankin Physical Therapy wants you to be safe and fall free.
Remember to always ask for Rankin Physical Therapy
... See MoreSee Less

Are falls preventable? 
Most falls result from a number of risk factors including changes in your body that increase your risk for a fall, things we do or don’t do that increase our fall risk, and hazards in our home or community.

In order to prevent falls you can exercise to improve your strength and balance, have your doctor review your medicines, have your vision checked, and make your home safer.

When starting an exercise program talk to your doctor and make sure classes are for your age group and or ability level. Identify and eliminate fall hazards in your home. Medications may cause side effects that make you dizzy and increase your fall risk. Be sure you can read your labels and ask for an annual medication review. Ask for annual eye exam after the age of 50. Multifocal lenses may blur or distort your vision looking down, also increasing your fall risk. Check your blood pressure regularly, if you get dizzy when you stand up see your doctor and have them look at your blood pressure medication as it could relate to a fall risk.
Rankin Physical Therapy wants you to be safe and fall free.
Remember to always ask for Rankin Physical Therapy

Rankin Physical Therapy has 8 convenient neighborhood locations.

We invest in AMAZING PHYSICAL THERAPY FACILITIES and PHYSICAL THERAPISTS so we can help you better achieve your goals.

Our clinics offer aquatic physical therapy, private treatment rooms, modern/state of the art equipment, home health services, and much more.

Our physical therapists provide compassionate care, are trained in the newest and most effective techniques, and also give one on one individual treatment.

We were voted the areas BEST PHYSICAL THERAPY practice because we provide an exceptional level of care and service which sets us apart.

If you need physical therapy, you have a right to choose who provides your therapy.

Rankin Physical Therapy
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 304.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
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Becoming physically active requires a conscious effort for most adults. Develop an exercise program to fit your individual goals. Be sure to consider ways to increase your activity levels throughout the day. Every little bit helps! If you find it too challenging to fit 30 minutes of activity into your day, break it up into 10 to 15-minute intervals and accumulate your activity throughout the day.

Exercise Tips to Activate your lifestyle.

Challenge yourself to move more! Find ways to become more active in your daily living. For example, you can:

Take the stairs instead of the elevator or escalator.
Take a 10-minute stretch or walk break at work.
Turn on the music and vacuum.
Wash your own car – and your neighbor’s too.
Do strength-training exercises in front of the TV
Park in the furthest parking space and walk.
Make Fitness fun!

The secret to a successful fitness program is enjoyment! Choose physical activities that you enjoy doing. This could mean walking, playing tennis, biking or joining a team sport.

Consider trying something different, such as yoga or kickboxing.
Coach a youth sports team – your rewards will be many.
Enter a race – it will motivate you.
Plant a garden and share its beauty and bounty.
Make Sunday walks or hikes a weekly tradition.
Set up a morning walking or biking club; exercise buddies can help you be honest.
Anticipate the unexpected.

Lousy weather, travel (both business and pleasure) and the ups and downs of daily life can play havoc with your best-laid fitness plan. Always have a backup plan. If it is raining have an indoor activity to do, If you are taking a trip, throw in your walking shoes or a jump rope and fit in exercise when you can.

In addition to being stronger and more fit, aerobic exercise has so many health benefits. If you need help getting started or need some motivation to contact your physical therapist. They can work with you to create an exercise plan that works for you and your ability levels. You are never too old to be more active!

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Becoming physically active requires a conscious effort for most adults. Develop an exercise program to fit your individual goals. Be sure to consider ways to increase your activity levels throughout the day. Every little bit helps! If you find it too challenging to fit 30 minutes of activity into your day, break it up into 10 to 15-minute intervals and accumulate your activity throughout the day.

Exercise Tips to Activate your lifestyle.

Challenge yourself to move more! Find ways to become more active in your daily living. For example, you can:

Take the stairs instead of the elevator or escalator.
Take a 10-minute stretch or walk break at work.
Turn on the music and vacuum.
Wash your own car – and your neighbor’s too.
Do strength-training exercises in front of the TV
Park in the furthest parking space and walk.
Make Fitness fun!

The secret to a successful fitness program is enjoyment! Choose physical activities that you enjoy doing. This could mean walking, playing tennis, biking or joining a team sport.

Consider trying something different, such as yoga or kickboxing.
Coach a youth sports team – your rewards will be many.
Enter a race – it will motivate you.
Plant a garden and share its beauty and bounty.
Make Sunday walks or hikes a weekly tradition.
Set up a morning walking or biking club; exercise buddies can help you be honest.
Anticipate the unexpected.

Lousy weather, travel (both business and pleasure) and the ups and downs of daily life can play havoc with your best-laid fitness plan. Always have a backup plan. If it is raining have an indoor activity to do, If you are taking a trip, throw in your walking shoes or a jump rope and fit in exercise when you can.

In addition to being stronger and more fit, aerobic exercise has so many health benefits. If you need help getting started or need some motivation to contact your physical therapist. They can work with you to create an exercise plan that works for you and your ability levels. You are never too old to be more active!

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123

Rankin Physical Therapy - Martinsburg
302 Rock Cliff Dr.
(304) 267-0866
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Rankin Physical Therapy - Martinsburg
302 Rock Cliff Dr.
(304) 267-0866