Martinsburg

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Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness

Berkeley Springs 304.258.1300
Hagerstown 301.790.9999
Hedgesville 304.754.6000
Inwood 304.229.1010
Martinsburg 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown 304.876.1000
Spring Mills 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness

Berkeley Springs          304.258.1300
Hagerstown                  301.790.9999
Hedgesville                   304.754.6000
Inwood                          304.229.1010
Martinsburg                  304.267.0866
Shepherdstown            304.876.1000
Spring Mills                   304.274.0123

At Rankin Physical Therapy we put our patients' needs first. Visit our website, or stop by one of our 8 locations, to learn more about our services today!

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown (North) - 301.790.9999
Hagerstown (South) - Coming Soon
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

At Rankin Physical Therapy we put our patients needs first. Visit our website, or stop by one of our 8 locations, to learn more about our services today!

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown (North) - 301.790.9999
Hagerstown (South) - Coming Soon
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123

The care I got here was exceptional. I could not have asked for anything better. The professionalism was fantastic. I will highly recommend PT here. The people were not only the best, but very caring! ... See MoreSee Less

The care I got here was exceptional.  I could not have asked for anything better.  The professionalism was fantastic.  I will highly recommend PT here.  The people were not only the best, but very caring!

Five players to watch in Class AAA

By Greg Carey in High School Sports
July 27, 2019 at 9:47AM
In anticipation of the action on the gridiron, we’ll examine five players in each class to keep an eye on in 2019.

Beginning with Class AAA (in no order)

1 — Jarod Bowie, WR, Martinsburg

A number of Bulldogs could be on this list, but the senior Bowie is perhaps the safest pick.

He was a first-team all-state wideout as a junior in 2018 and has been wreaking havoc on opposing defenses for several seasons in a Bulldogs’ uniform.

With Elijah Banks taking over full-time at quarterback, Bowie’s crisp route-running and reliable hands will be counted on to produce for a balanced offense. That balance has helped make Martinsburg’s offense as feared as any unit in the state and has the Bulldogs riding a state record 42-game win streak.

With former Randy Moss Award winner Malakai Brown transferring from Hedgesville to Martinsburg, defenses can only afford so much attention on Bowie, who is a difficult 1-on-1 cover.

2 — Zeiqui Lawton, DE/OLB, South Charleston

Lawton has earned second-team all-state honors each of the last two seasons for the Black Eagles. While that’s a strong achievement for any player, it’s almost unheard of to receive the honor as a freshman and sophomore.

Yet that’s just what Lawton did and he’s proven he can live in backfields coming off the edge.

South Charleston will likely need even more production from Lawton this season considering it lost linebacker Drew Joseph, a tackling machine who was always around the ball.

Lawton began to generate interest from Division I schools last summer and has added offers from West Virginia and Illinois since.

If the Black Eagles are going to improve and seriously challenge for a playoff berth, Lawton will be counted on to dominant defensively as a junior against both the run and pass.

One of the state’s more electrifying players a year ago, Taylor helped lead Williamstown to the Class A title game.

This year, he’ll showcase his skills at the highest level in the state after transferring to play for the Patriots.

With tailback Nick Yoho and quarterback Brayden Mooney accounting for a majority of the team’s offensive production a year ago and both no longer around, Taylor will immediately be a featured player for the Patriots.

His speed and vision make him tough to tame coming out of the backfield, and Taylor has proven he can make plays in the passing game as well.

Taylor’s presence will be a welcomed addition for new coach Nathan Tanner as Parkersburg South looks to return to the postseason for a second straight season. The Patriots, however, will have their work cut out as seven of their nine in-state opponents qualified for the Class AAA playoffs in 2018.

4 — Blake Hartman, RB, Musselman

Much like the aforementioned Lawton, Hartman has enjoyed a pair of special seasons to start his prep career.

As a freshman, he earned second-team all-state honors, before being bumped up to the first team a year ago following a sensational sophomore campaign.

The Applemen’s leading rusher and receiver last season, Hartman helped lead Musselman to a memorable 11-win season and two playoff victories.

Also a safety, Hartman plays a prominent role on Musselman’s defense as well as its special teams units.

If he can continue to increase his production in all phases, Hartman’s name could be in the discussion for the Kennedy Award by season’s end.

5 — Wyatt Milum, OL, Spring Valley

Milum received an offer from Alabama earlier this summer and was a household before that after earning second-team all-state honors as a sophomore.

However, playing on a Timberwolves team with two other high-level Division I offensive linemen that was full of senior standouts in 2018, Milum was another key player on a loaded roster.

This year, in his junior season, Milum will look to be an even more dominant force up front.

At last month’s 7-on-7 camp at West Virginia University, Spring Valley head coach Brad Dingess noted that Milum had added between 30-35 pounds and a surplus of muscle.

Spring Valley has reached the Class AAA title game each of the last three seasons thanks in large part to success on the ground through its Wing-T offense. For that to continue, Milum will need to pave the way for a stable of backs.

Others to watch: Kerion Martin, Capital; J.J. Roberts, Cabell Midland; Teddy Marshall, Martinsburg; Malakai Brown, Martinsburg; Brocton Blair, Huntington; Colby Piner, Greenbrier East; Keon Padmore-Johnson, Spring Mills
... See MoreSee Less

Five players to watch in Class AAA

By Greg Carey in High School Sports
July 27, 2019 at 9:47AM
In anticipation of the action on the gridiron, we’ll examine five players in each class to keep an eye on in 2019.

Beginning with Class AAA (in no order)

1 — Jarod Bowie, WR, Martinsburg

A number of Bulldogs could be on this list, but the senior Bowie is perhaps the safest pick.

He was a first-team all-state wideout as a junior in 2018 and has been wreaking havoc on opposing defenses for several seasons in a Bulldogs’ uniform.

With Elijah Banks taking over full-time at quarterback, Bowie’s crisp route-running and reliable hands will be counted on to produce for a balanced offense. That balance has helped make Martinsburg’s offense as feared as any unit in the state and has the Bulldogs riding a state record 42-game win streak. 

With former Randy Moss Award winner Malakai Brown transferring from Hedgesville to Martinsburg, defenses can only afford so much attention on Bowie, who is a difficult 1-on-1 cover.

2 — Zeiqui Lawton, DE/OLB, South Charleston 

Lawton has earned second-team all-state honors each of the last two seasons for the Black Eagles. While that’s a strong achievement for any player, it’s almost unheard of to receive the honor as a freshman and sophomore.

Yet that’s just what Lawton did and he’s proven he can live in backfields coming off the edge.

South Charleston will likely need even more production from Lawton this season considering it lost linebacker Drew Joseph, a tackling machine who was always around the ball.

Lawton began to generate interest from Division I schools last summer and has added offers from West Virginia and Illinois since.

If the Black Eagles are going to improve and seriously challenge for a playoff berth, Lawton will be counted on to dominant defensively as a junior against both the run and pass.

One of the state’s more electrifying players a year ago, Taylor helped lead Williamstown to the Class A title game.

This year, he’ll showcase his skills at the highest level in the state after transferring to play for the Patriots.

With tailback Nick Yoho and quarterback Brayden Mooney accounting for a majority of the team’s offensive production a year ago and both no longer around, Taylor will immediately be a featured player for the Patriots.

His speed and vision make him tough to tame coming out of the backfield, and Taylor has proven he can make plays in the passing game as well.

Taylor’s presence will be a welcomed addition for new coach Nathan Tanner as Parkersburg South looks to return to the postseason for a second straight season. The Patriots, however, will have their work cut out as seven of their nine in-state opponents qualified for the Class AAA playoffs in 2018.

4 — Blake Hartman, RB, Musselman

Much like the aforementioned Lawton, Hartman has enjoyed a pair of special seasons to start his prep career.

As a freshman, he earned second-team all-state honors, before being bumped up to the first team a year ago following a sensational sophomore campaign.

The Applemen’s leading rusher and receiver last season, Hartman helped lead Musselman to a memorable 11-win season and two playoff victories.

Also a safety, Hartman plays a prominent role on Musselman’s defense as well as its special teams units.

If he can continue to increase his production in all phases, Hartman’s name could be in the discussion for the Kennedy Award by season’s end.

5 — Wyatt Milum, OL, Spring Valley

Milum received an offer from Alabama earlier this summer and was a household before that after earning second-team all-state honors as a sophomore.

However, playing on a Timberwolves team with two other high-level Division I offensive linemen that was full of senior standouts in 2018, Milum was another key player on a loaded roster.

This year, in his junior season, Milum will look to be an even more dominant force up front. 

At last month’s 7-on-7 camp at West Virginia University, Spring Valley head coach Brad Dingess noted that Milum had added between 30-35 pounds and a surplus of muscle.

Spring Valley has reached the Class AAA title game each of the last three seasons thanks in large part to success on the ground through its Wing-T offense. For that to continue, Milum will need to pave the way for a stable of backs.

Others to watch: Kerion Martin, Capital; J.J. Roberts, Cabell Midland; Teddy Marshall, Martinsburg; Malakai Brown, Martinsburg; Brocton Blair, Huntington; Colby Piner, Greenbrier East; Keon Padmore-Johnson, Spring Mills

NATIONAL CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE DAY
On August 4th, National Chocolate Chip Cookie Day gives us an opportunity to dunk American’s #1 favorite cookie. Whether yours are homemade or storebought, pour a glass of milk and enjoy.
... See MoreSee Less

NATIONAL CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE DAY
On August 4th, National Chocolate Chip Cookie Day gives us an opportunity to dunk American’s #1 favorite cookie. Whether yours are homemade or storebought, pour a glass of milk and enjoy.

NATIONAL WATERMELON DAY
National Watermelon Day on August 3rd recognizes the refreshing summertime treat enjoyed at picnics and fairs! Watermelon is 92% water, which is why it is so satisfying in the summer heat.
... See MoreSee Less

NATIONAL WATERMELON DAY
National Watermelon Day on August 3rd recognizes the refreshing summertime treat enjoyed at picnics and fairs! Watermelon is 92% water, which is why it is so satisfying in the summer heat.

NATIONAL WATER BALLOON DAY
Fill ’em up! The first Friday in August ushers in National Water Balloon Day just in time for the hottest days of summer!
Pop, throw, splash, or just squish! What kid or adult doesn’t enjoy a water balloon in the hot summer? Since Edgar Ellington invented the waterproof sock in 1950, backyards haven’t been the same.
... See MoreSee Less

NATIONAL WATER BALLOON DAY
Fill ’em up! The first Friday in August ushers in National Water Balloon Day just in time for the hottest days of summer!
Pop, throw, splash, or just squish! What kid or adult doesn’t enjoy a water balloon in the hot summer? Since Edgar Ellington invented the waterproof sock in 1950, backyards haven’t been the same.

On August 1, National Girlfriends Day encourages women across the U.S. to get together and celebrate their special bond of friendship. ... See MoreSee Less

On August 1, National Girlfriends Day encourages women across the U.S. to get together and celebrate their special bond of friendship.

Make it a GREAT month! ... See MoreSee Less

Make it a GREAT month!

July 31 - National Avocado Day
There are many reasons to celebrate the National Avocado Day. For one, avocados targeting insulin resistance with heart-healthy fats. They also fight Alzheimer’s with its Omega 3 fatty acids. Another avocado super power is preventing and repairing damage due to its source of Vitamins C, E and K.
Rankin Physical Therapy
... See MoreSee Less

July 31 - National Avocado Day 
There are many reasons to celebrate the National Avocado Day. For one, avocados targeting insulin resistance with heart-healthy fats. They also fight Alzheimer’s with its Omega 3 fatty acids. Another avocado super power is preventing and repairing damage due to its source of Vitamins C, E and K.
Rankin Physical Therapy
#RankinPT

The heat is getting very DANGEROUS. If you don’t have a place to escape from the heat - you are welcome to come to a Rankin Physical Therapy / Fitness Center location to cool off in the AC and get some cold water to drink. Please be careful - the next couple days are going to be extremely hot!

It’s HOT – be careful out there

Mark Netherda

Summer is upon us! Besides the risk of painful sunburn – and skin cancer risks – the sun and heat also bring risks of heat-related illnesses.

Mild illnesses include simple dehydration (not enough water in your body from sweating), heat rash (also called prickly heat), temporary swelling of hands and feet, cramping of the large muscles, and heat related collapse or fainting.

While uncomfortable, these are rarely serious. This article focuses on the most serious of the heat related illnesses – heat exhaustion and life-threatening heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion occurs with strenuous exercise on hot days. It occurs most commonly in competing or practicing athletes and workers performing heavy labor. Signs of heat exhaustion include the inability to continue the activity, high body temperatures in the 101-104 degrees range and extreme weakness, often to the point of collapse. Sufferers usually sweat heavily, appear pale, have muscle and abdominal cramps, headaches, and sometimes with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. They do not have neurologic effects like abnormal behavior, seizures or altered consciousness.

Individuals should rest, laying down in a cool place (in shade or an air-conditioned setting). Any bulky clothing should be removed. Cool towels, showers or baths should be used as available to cool the person down. Chilled water or sports drinks should be given. If the person is vomiting or is too nauseated to drink, then evaluation at a hospital is recommended. If the person loses consciousness, has a seizure or is behaving abnormally, call 911 or take the person to the nearest emergency room as soon as possible.

Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat illness. This life-threatening illness requires immediate emergency care at a hospital. Body temperature is usually over 104 degrees. An individual is usually sweating but, may not as the illness advances. Other symptoms include: behavior changes, irritability, emotional instability, combativeness, and/or confusion. This can progress to seizures, loss of consciousness, and coma. It can cause permanent brain damage and if left untreated, death can occur. Individuals usually have organ damage to the kidneys, liver and muscles, some of which can be permanent.

Once heat stroke is recognized, actions should be taken to cool the person while transporting or awaiting transport to the nearest emergency center. Remove heavy clothing or gear, using cool towels on the skin and placing ice packs in the arm pits and groin area (where there are lots of blood vessels) is helpful. Even if the person regains consciousness, evaluation at an emergency center is necessary to avoid more damage to the brain and organs.

According to the CDC, heat-related illnesses killed an average of 380 people each year from 1999 to 2018. Prevention is the best defense against heat-related illnesses. Be aware of the weather and predicted temperatures when planning outdoor activities. If the temperature is going to be over 90 degrees rethink your plans and avoid strenuous activities. If you must continue, wear cool, loose clothing. Have plenty of cool drinks, cooling towels and ice packs on hand, and take frequent breaks in the shade. Also, be aware of those around you. A person suffering from heat stroke often does not recognize it.

If you see someone you suspect might be overheated, showing signs of confusion or acting strangely, take action! Check them out and help if they need it. Being cool-headed in a hot situation could save a life!
... See MoreSee Less

The heat is getting very DANGEROUS. If you don’t have a place to escape from the heat - you are welcome to come to a Rankin Physical Therapy / Fitness Center location to cool off in the AC and get some cold water to drink. Please be careful - the next couple days are going to be extremely hot!

It’s HOT – be careful out there

Mark Netherda

Summer is upon us! Besides the risk of painful sunburn – and skin cancer risks – the sun and heat also bring risks of heat-related illnesses.

Mild illnesses include simple dehydration (not enough water in your body from sweating), heat rash (also called prickly heat), temporary swelling of hands and feet, cramping of the large muscles, and heat related collapse or fainting.

While uncomfortable, these are rarely serious. This article focuses on the most serious of the heat related illnesses – heat exhaustion and life-threatening heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion occurs with strenuous exercise on hot days. It occurs most commonly in competing or practicing athletes and workers performing heavy labor. Signs of heat exhaustion include the inability to continue the activity, high body temperatures in the 101-104 degrees range and extreme weakness, often to the point of collapse. Sufferers usually sweat heavily, appear pale, have muscle and abdominal cramps, headaches, and sometimes with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. They do not have neurologic effects like abnormal behavior, seizures or altered consciousness.

Individuals should rest, laying down in a cool place (in shade or an air-conditioned setting). Any bulky clothing should be removed. Cool towels, showers or baths should be used as available to cool the person down. Chilled water or sports drinks should be given. If the person is vomiting or is too nauseated to drink, then evaluation at a hospital is recommended. If the person loses consciousness, has a seizure or is behaving abnormally, call 911 or take the person to the nearest emergency room as soon as possible.

Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat illness. This life-threatening illness requires immediate emergency care at a hospital. Body temperature is usually over 104 degrees. An individual is usually sweating but, may not as the illness advances. Other symptoms include: behavior changes, irritability, emotional instability, combativeness, and/or confusion. This can progress to seizures, loss of consciousness, and coma. It can cause permanent brain damage and if left untreated, death can occur. Individuals usually have organ damage to the kidneys, liver and muscles, some of which can be permanent.

Once heat stroke is recognized, actions should be taken to cool the person while transporting or awaiting transport to the nearest emergency center. Remove heavy clothing or gear, using cool towels on the skin and placing ice packs in the arm pits and groin area (where there are lots of blood vessels) is helpful. Even if the person regains consciousness, evaluation at an emergency center is necessary to avoid more damage to the brain and organs.

According to the CDC, heat-related illnesses killed an average of 380 people each year from 1999 to 2018. Prevention is the best defense against heat-related illnesses. Be aware of the weather and predicted temperatures when planning outdoor activities. If the temperature is going to be over 90 degrees rethink your plans and avoid strenuous activities. If you must continue, wear cool, loose clothing. Have plenty of cool drinks, cooling towels and ice packs on hand, and take frequent breaks in the shade. Also, be aware of those around you. A person suffering from heat stroke often does not recognize it.

If you see someone you suspect might be overheated, showing signs of confusion or acting strangely, take action! Check them out and help if they need it. Being cool-headed in a hot situation could save a life!

#physicaltherapy #RankinPT #Hagerstown #Hedgesville #BerkeleySprings #Martinsburg #SpringMills #Shepherdstown #Inwood ... See MoreSee Less

New class in H.S. hoops brings changes to state tourney schedule

Eddie Ferrari/WVMetroNews.com

South Charleston's Maliha Witten is pressured by Parkersburg's Bre Wilson (32) and Shay Kirby.
By Joe Brocato in High School Sports, Sports
July 15, 2019 at 4:54PM
MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — With the addition of a fourth class to the West Virginia high school basketball alignment secured for the 2020-2021 season, the focus for the WVSSAC turns towards implementing and then evaluating the new landscape of high school hoops.

Last week, the State of Education approved a WVSSAC proposal to add a fourth classification to high school basketball in a two-year pilot program. The changes will go into effect for the 2020-2021 season. The proposal passed on a 7-2 vote.

“It takes away all of the unknowns and allows us to move forward, have definite plans and definite numbers,” said WVSSAC Executive Director Bernie Dolan.

Although a list of projected classes was circulated as an example of how the classifications may look, school enrollment figures will be finalized by October 1st. Afterwards, the official classification list will be announced. Each school will have a score from 1-100 that weighs several factors: 70 percent from enrollment, 20 percent from location [to a city or county seat] and 10 percent is a combination of the economics of the county and students enrolled.

“Location is beginning to be a bigger factor than just simply enrollment,” Dolan said. “It is obviously the first time that we have looked at things other than enrollment and changing the cut score to identify things that are important.”

With an additional class in play, seven games will be added to both the boys and girls state tournaments. Over a 12-day period, 56 state tournament games would be scheduled. In all likelihood, each tourney will be expanded by a day, meaning the competition will run from Tuesday morning to Saturday evening.

“We are looking to see if it is possible to get any more games in during the week Wednesday through Friday. I am not sure if that is possible without going so late into the night,” Dolan said.

In April, the Board of Control, which consists of WVSSAC member schools, voted 111-26 in favor of creating a fourth class. Dolan says that same group will evaluate the trial program and vote to keep the fourth class or revert back to the previous system.

“It will go back to the Board of Control for a vote. So it will really be up to them to determine whether they feel like it is doing what it is supposed to… to balance each class and whether or not there is more variety in those who qualify for the tournament.”

While no formal proposals to create a fourth class in any other sport have been crafted, Dolan says there are reasons basketball was more advantageous than others to launch this trial program.

“If you are thinking football, in that format, we would have to figure out how to classify each of the out-of-state schools. I don’t see us being able to do that to our out-of-state opponents.”

Football playoff ratings are determined using a formula that involves win/loss records and strength of schedule.

Dolan discussed the viability of a fourth class potentially being added to other sports that the WVSSAC sponsors.

“Volleyball could be another one that could work without a whole lot of difficulty.”

“Baseball and softball in theory could work. But we run the risk of weather. We have a lot of trouble getting our current situation completed as it stands now. It could fit but in order to get the schedule, it could be more challenging.”

The state baseball tournament last month was extended by a day due to weather affecting play early in the event.

“Cross country would be easy for the format to work. Track would be a little bit more challenging just because of the number of events. In wrestling, we would have to change the format. We wouldn’t be able to have four classes of separate tournaments.”

“It is possible that it could roll out into other sports but realistically, there are some sports that it would be a big challenge.”
... See MoreSee Less

If you are a athlete or active person and have an injury, Rankin Physical Therapy has Physical Therapists on staff that specialize in Sport Medicine that can get you get back in the game! Call us today!!!
Martinsburg 304.267.0866
Inwood 304.229.1010
Hedgesville 304.754.6000
Berkeley Springs 304.258.1300
Spring Mills 304.274.0123
Shepherdstown 304.876.1000
Hagerstown 301.790.9999
#RankinPT
... See MoreSee Less

If you are a athlete or active person and have an injury, Rankin Physical Therapy has Physical Therapists on staff that specialize in Sport Medicine that can get you get back in the game! Call us today!!!
Martinsburg              304.267.0866
Inwood                       304.229.1010
Hedgesville               304.754.6000
Berkeley Springs      304.258.1300
Spring Mills               304.274.0123
Shepherdstown        304.876.1000
Hagerstown              301.790.9999
#RankinPT

If you have a back problem, seeing a physical therapist within the first 30 days can significantly decrease the use of opioid medications.
Rankin Physical Therapy -
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

If you have a back problem, seeing a physical therapist within the first 30 days can significantly decrease the use of opioid medications.
Rankin Physical Therapy -
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123

Rankin Physical Therapy:

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

The staff at Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness wish you and you family a Safe and Happy 4th of July. ... See MoreSee Less

The staff at Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness wish you and you family a Safe and Happy 4th of July.

Happy 1st of July!! The beginning of a NEW month is the perfect time to start something special and new. Make July an amazing month. ... See MoreSee Less

Happy 1st of July!! The beginning of a NEW month is the perfect time to start something special and new. Make July an amazing month.

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness
Berkeley Springs 304.258.1300
Hagerstown 301.790.9999
Hedgesville 304.754.6000
Inwood 304.229.1010
Martinsburg 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown 304.876.1000
Spring Mills 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

It’s HOT – be careful out there

Mark Netherda

Summer is upon us! Besides the risk of painful sunburn – and skin cancer risks – the sun and heat also bring risks of heat-related illnesses.

Mild illnesses include simple dehydration (not enough water in your body from sweating), heat rash (also called prickly heat), temporary swelling of hands and feet, cramping of the large muscles, and heat related collapse or fainting.

While uncomfortable, these are rarely serious. This article focuses on the most serious of the heat related illnesses – heat exhaustion and life-threatening heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion occurs with strenuous exercise on hot days. It occurs most commonly in competing or practicing athletes and workers performing heavy labor. Signs of heat exhaustion include the inability to continue the activity, high body temperatures in the 101-104 degrees range and extreme weakness, often to the point of collapse. Sufferers usually sweat heavily, appear pale, have muscle and abdominal cramps, headaches, and sometimes with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. They do not have neurologic effects like abnormal behavior, seizures or altered consciousness.

Individuals should rest, laying down in a cool place (in shade or an air-conditioned setting). Any bulky clothing should be removed. Cool towels, showers or baths should be used as available to cool the person down. Chilled water or sports drinks should be given. If the person is vomiting or is too nauseated to drink, then evaluation at a hospital is recommended. If the person loses consciousness, has a seizure or is behaving abnormally, call 911 or take the person to the nearest emergency room as soon as possible.

Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat illness. This life-threatening illness requires immediate emergency care at a hospital. Body temperature is usually over 104 degrees. An individual is usually sweating but, may not as the illness advances. Other symptoms include: behavior changes, irritability, emotional instability, combativeness, and/or confusion. This can progress to seizures, loss of consciousness, and coma. It can cause permanent brain damage and if left untreated, death can occur. Individuals usually have organ damage to the kidneys, liver and muscles, some of which can be permanent.

Once heat stroke is recognized, actions should be taken to cool the person while transporting or awaiting transport to the nearest emergency center. Remove heavy clothing or gear, using cool towels on the skin and placing ice packs in the arm pits and groin area (where there are lots of blood vessels) is helpful. Even if the person regains consciousness, evaluation at an emergency center is necessary to avoid more damage to the brain and organs.

According to the CDC, heat-related illnesses killed an average of 380 people each year from 1999 to 2018. Prevention is the best defense against heat-related illnesses. Be aware of the weather and predicted temperatures when planning outdoor activities. If the temperature is going to be over 90 degrees rethink your plans and avoid strenuous activities. If you must continue, wear cool, loose clothing. Have plenty of cool drinks, cooling towels and ice packs on hand, and take frequent breaks in the shade. Also, be aware of those around you. A person suffering from heat stroke often does not recognize it.

If you see someone you suspect might be overheated, showing signs of confusion or acting strangely, take action! Check them out and help if they need it. Being cool-headed in a hot situation could save a life!
... See MoreSee Less

It’s HOT – be careful out there

Mark Netherda

Summer is upon us! Besides the risk of painful sunburn – and skin cancer risks – the sun and heat also bring risks of heat-related illnesses.

Mild illnesses include simple dehydration (not enough water in your body from sweating), heat rash (also called prickly heat), temporary swelling of hands and feet, cramping of the large muscles, and heat related collapse or fainting.

While uncomfortable, these are rarely serious. This article focuses on the most serious of the heat related illnesses – heat exhaustion and life-threatening heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion occurs with strenuous exercise on hot days. It occurs most commonly in competing or practicing athletes and workers performing heavy labor. Signs of heat exhaustion include the inability to continue the activity, high body temperatures in the 101-104 degrees range and extreme weakness, often to the point of collapse. Sufferers usually sweat heavily, appear pale, have muscle and abdominal cramps, headaches, and sometimes with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. They do not have neurologic effects like abnormal behavior, seizures or altered consciousness.

Individuals should rest, laying down in a cool place (in shade or an air-conditioned setting). Any bulky clothing should be removed. Cool towels, showers or baths should be used as available to cool the person down. Chilled water or sports drinks should be given. If the person is vomiting or is too nauseated to drink, then evaluation at a hospital is recommended. If the person loses consciousness, has a seizure or is behaving abnormally, call 911 or take the person to the nearest emergency room as soon as possible.

Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat illness. This life-threatening illness requires immediate emergency care at a hospital. Body temperature is usually over 104 degrees. An individual is usually sweating but, may not as the illness advances. Other symptoms include: behavior changes, irritability, emotional instability, combativeness, and/or confusion. This can progress to seizures, loss of consciousness, and coma. It can cause permanent brain damage and if left untreated, death can occur. Individuals usually have organ damage to the kidneys, liver and muscles, some of which can be permanent.

Once heat stroke is recognized, actions should be taken to cool the person while transporting or awaiting transport to the nearest emergency center. Remove heavy clothing or gear, using cool towels on the skin and placing ice packs in the arm pits and groin area (where there are lots of blood vessels) is helpful. Even if the person regains consciousness, evaluation at an emergency center is necessary to avoid more damage to the brain and organs.

According to the CDC, heat-related illnesses killed an average of 380 people each year from 1999 to 2018. Prevention is the best defense against heat-related illnesses. Be aware of the weather and predicted temperatures when planning outdoor activities. If the temperature is going to be over 90 degrees rethink your plans and avoid strenuous activities. If you must continue, wear cool, loose clothing. Have plenty of cool drinks, cooling towels and ice packs on hand, and take frequent breaks in the shade. Also, be aware of those around you. A person suffering from heat stroke often does not recognize it.

If you see someone you suspect might be overheated, showing signs of confusion or acting strangely, take action! Check them out and help if they need it. Being cool-headed in a hot situation could save a life!

2 months ago

Martinsburg, West Virginia

This is Evie..a rescue we've only had 48 hrs..15 min ago she slipped out of her harness and took off in Spring Mills Farms area. Please call 3942749375 asap! She is fragile and scared and hiding somewhere nearby.PLEASE SHARE ... See MoreSee Less