Berkley County

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Updated list of restaurants doing food delivery. Please add what you have. Thanks ... See MoreSee Less

Updated list of restaurants doing food delivery. Please add what you have. Thanks

Comment on Facebook

Please follow Charlotte’s Cafe for our daily specials.

The list needs updated. Country inn restaurant is now closed

Morgan on main posted they were closing the doors. I dont think their open. Neither is taris .

Dee Waggoner Thomas Angus & Ale, 304-258-7575 Open Daily 11:30AM-8PM Curbside Pickup ONLY Berkeley Springs Bowling Alley Snack Bar, 304-258-1815 Mon thru Thur 8 am to 9 pm Fri & Sat 8 am to midnight Sunday 10 am to 9 pm Call ahead to check hours and availability Berkeley Springs Brewing Co, 304-258-3369 Closed until Friday-Sunday Take-out ONLY Roys Service Center and Betty Lou's Ole Garage Cafe, 304-258-3559 Open Daily for Breakfast and Lunch until 2PM Offering Take-out and Curbside Pick-up Cacapon Market/Crispy Crunchy Chicken, 304-258-5000 Open Daily, Call Ahead for Availability Cacapon Resort Lodge Restaurant, 304-258-1022 Open Daily, Breakfast 8-10:30, Lunch 11:30-2, Dinner 5-8 Take-out Available Canary Grill - Closed until April 1. Charlotte's Cafe, 304-500-2629 Open 7AM-4PM (Closed Wednesdays) Offering Take-out, Curbside Pickup and Delivery to companies within a 5 mile radius. Call to place orders. Coolfont Resort, 304-500-0500 Open Thursday-Monday (Closed Tues/Wed) Offering Take-out Fairfax Coffee House, 304-500-2710 Open Daily Offering Take-out and Curbside Pickup Georgies Pizza at Mountainside Restaurant, 304-258-2242 Open Daily Offering Take-out and Free Delivery with 5 mile radius Hillbilly Heaven Bar and Grill, 304-258-0004 Open Daily, Call Ahead for Availability Lot 12 Public House, 304-258-6264 Open Friday-Sunday Call Ahead for Availability Mi Ranchito Mexican Restaurant, 304-258-4800 Open Daily (Closed Tuesday) - Call Ahead for Availability Offering Take-out Mountaineer's Sports Bar & Grill, 304-258-7970 Open Daily (Closed Tuesdays) Offering Take-out and Curbside Pickup Ravenwood Pub, (727) 742-8333 Hours Vary - Check Facebook page Offering Take-out, Curbside Pickup and Delivery Call Ahead for Availability Southern Belle Truck Stop and Restaurant, 304-258-3648 Open Daily Offering Take-out The Naked Olive Lounge, 304-500-2668 Closed until further notice, Call Ahead for Availability Offering Take-out Tony's Butcher Block, 304-258-4770 Open Daily - Call Ahead for Availability Offering Take-out New Delivery Service Deno Stiles, 301-524-8888 Call for rates

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The Class AA Boys All-State Basketball Team as selected by the West Virginia Sports Writers Association.

First Team

Obinna Anochili-Killen, Chapmanville, Sr. (Captain)

Braeden Crews, Bluefield, Sr.

David Early, Logan, Sr.

Jaelin Johnson, Fairmont Senior, Jr.

Luke LeRose, Shady Spring, Sr.

Bryson Lucas, Robert C Byrd, Jr.

Isaac McKneely, Poca, Soph.

Tommy Williams, Shady Spring, Sr.

Second Team

Drew Hatfield, Mingo Central, Sr. (Captain)

Jansen Knotts, Frankfort, Sr.

Sean Martin, Bluefield, Sr.

Khori Miles, Robert C Byrd, Sr.

Brayden Miller, Roane County, Jr.

Gunner Murphy, North Marion, Sr.

Nick Stalnaker, Bridgeport, Sr.

Jadyn Stewart, Braxton County, Sr.

Third Team

Austin Ball, Man, Soph.

Gavin Barkley, Berkeley Springs, Soph.

Jared Cannady, Independence, Sr.

Jon Hamilton, Scott, Sr.

Kolton Painter, Nitro, Soph.

Shad Sauvage, James Monroe, Soph.

Andrew Shull, Chapmanville, Sr. (Captain)

Zach Taylor, Oak Glen, Sr.

Honorable Mention

Gavin Asterino, East Fairmont; Jagger Bell, Scott; Jack Bifano, Bridgeport; Ethan Blackburn, Westside; David Blanco, Frankfort; John Blankenship, Lincoln County; Caleb Blevins, Man; Grant Bonner, Herbert Hoover; Nick Bryant, Wayne; Hunter Bush, Point Pleasant; Braden Chapman, Shady Spring; Praise Chukwudozie, North Marion; Jacob Clark, Oak Glen; Brody Danberry, Sissonville; Jack Faulkner, Grafton; Christian Frye, Winfield; Kyle Gannon, Lewis County; Elijah Gillette, Weir; Mitchell Hainer, Logan; Jahiem House, Bluefield; Gavin Kennedy, Robert C Byrd; Ryan Leep, Lincoln; Jason Manns, Oak Hill; Jesiah Matlick, Philip Barbour; Michael McKinney, Independence; Peyton Meadows, PikeView; Hunter Morris, Winfield; Philip Mullins, Chapmanville; Kaulin Parris, Bluefield; Jacob Perdue, Oak Hill; Colten Pritt, Clay County; Daniel Reed, Westside; Noah Rittinger, Poca; Shawn See, Keyser; Ryan Shoemaker, Keyser; Zach Snyder, Lincoln; Kolby Stiltner, Wayne; Kobey Taylor-Williams, PikeView; Tyler Toler, Braxton County; Joseph Udoh, Sissonville; A J Williams, Liberty (Raleigh).
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Heidi
Hi there is it possible to accumulate a list of restaurants that are delivering in our small town? Alot of us can't leave our houses and I'm finding it quite impossible to find somewhere to get food delivered.
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Comment on Facebook

Thanks for posting my question!

There's another page that is doing that. Possibly the Chamber. I follow a few pages about BS, but not from there. 😊

The AC&T in Hancock is still open for food too. Most of them I have ordered from.

Charlotte’s Cafe is delivering within 5 mile radius of town. Follow us on Facebook to seeing our daily dinner specials

ROYS Best food in town!!!

However some of them may have changed their mind and have just closed.

Good idea

Get Uber eats app.

Following

F

Frances Luscher

UPDATE, 6pm 3/17: Governor Justice has ordered the closure of restaurants, bars and casinos. Businesses may still offer take-out or curbside pickup. We recommend calling ahead to check with each establishment to confirm their hours and offerings as everything is subject to change. Angus & Ale, 304-258-7575 Open Daily 11:30AM-8PM Curbside Pickup ONLY Berkeley Springs Bowling Alley Snack Bar, 304-258-1815 Mon thru Thur 8 am to 9 pm Fri & Sat 8 am to midnight Sunday 10 am to 9 pm Call ahead to check hours and availability Berkeley Springs Brewing Co, 304-258-3369 Closed until Friday-Sunday Take-out ONLY Roys Service Center and Betty Lou's Ole Garage Cafe, 304-258-3559 Open Daily for Breakfast and Lunch until 2PM Offering Take-out and Curbside Pick-up Cacapon Market/Crispy Crunchy Chicken, 304-258-5000 Open Daily, Call Ahead for Availability Cacapon Resort Lodge Restaurant, 304-258-1022 Open Daily, Breakfast 8-10:30, Lunch 11:30-2, Dinner 5-8 Take-out Available Canary Grill - Closed until April 1. Charlotte's Cafe, 304-500-2629 Open 7AM-4PM (Closed Wednesdays) Offering Take-out, Curbside Pickup and Delivery to companies within a 5 mile radius. Call to place orders. Coolfont Resort, 304-500-0500 Open Thursday-Monday (Closed Tues/Wed) Offering Take-out Fairfax Coffee House, 304-500-2710 Open Daily Offering Take-out and Curbside Pickup Georgies Pizza at Mountainside Restaurant, 304-258-2242 Open Daily Offering Take-out and Free Delivery with 5 mile radius Hillbilly Heaven Bar and Grill, 304-258-0004 Open Daily, Call Ahead for Availability Lot 12 Public House, 304-258-6264 Open Friday-Sunday Call Ahead for Availability Mi Ranchito Mexican Restaurant, 304-258-4800 Open Daily (Closed Tuesday) - Call Ahead for Availability Offering Take-out Morgan's on Main, 304-258-5999 Open Thursday-Monday Offering Take-out and Curbside Pickup Mountaineer's Sports Bar & Grill, 304-258-7970 Open Daily (Closed Tuesdays) Offering Take-out and Curbside Pickup Ravenwood Pub, (727) 742-8333 Hours Vary - Check Facebook page Offering Take-out, Curbside Pickup and Delivery Call Ahead for Availability Southern Belle Truck Stop and Restaurant, 304-258-3648 Open Daily Offering Take-out Tari's Premiere Cafe & Inn, 304-258-1196 Open Daily Offering Take-out and Curbside Pickup The Country Inn of Berkeley Springs, 304-258-1200 Open Daily Offering Take-out The Naked Olive Lounge, 304-500-2668 Closed until further notice, Call Ahead for Availability Offering Take-out Tony's Butcher Block, 304-258-4770 Open Daily - Call Ahead for Availability Offering Take-out New Delivery Service Deno Stiles, 301-524-8888 Call for rates

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Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center:
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center:
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123

Rankin Physical Therapy - Berkeley Springs
23 Fitness Lane
(304) 258-1300
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy - Berkeley Springs
23 Fitness Lane
(304) 258-1300

Comment on Facebook

Being there this weekend...shopping and dining made this whole pandemic situation easier to deal with ...

Comment on Facebook

THIS IS PROBABLY NOT TRUE and no one should be lulled into believing it!!!!

Beautiful place!!!

Best place in the country.

Coronavirus has 90,000 cases globally, 40,000 recovered, 3,000 died 60,000 deaths in the US from the flu in 2018. 3,000 globally from coronavirus. Who’s winning the trade war now? Wake up America, this wasn’t an accident. The media is destroying us!!

Visiting right now!

Holly Sousa

Paul Klaasse

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"A positive mind is a powerful weapon."
- Dr. Partha Nandi

Rankin Physical Therapy
Berkeley Springs 304.258.1300
Hedgesville 304.754.6000
Inwood 304.229.1010
Martinsburg 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown 301.790.0202
Spring Mills 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

A positive mind is a powerful weapon. 
- Dr. Partha Nandi  

Rankin Physical Therapy
Berkeley Springs        304.258.1300
Hedgesville                 304.754.6000
Inwood                         304.229.1010
Martinsburg                304.267.0866
North Hagerstown     301.790.9999
Shepherdstown          304.876.1000
South Hagerstown     301.790.0202
Spring Mills                 304.274.0123

Keys to Berkeley Springs castle change hands
By Tricia Lynn Strader For The Journal Mar 7, 2020

Journal photo by Tricia Lynn Strader

BERKELEY SPRINGS — The iconic 19th-century castle on the hill in Berkeley Springs has been sold.

Berkeley Springs Castle LLC sold the castle for $1.4 million to VDARE, a nonprofit based in Litchfield, Connecticut. The keys to the castle were turned over to VDARE founder Peter Brimelow and his wife, Lydia, on Feb. 21.

Brimelow said in an interview they plan to use the site for the family, as office space and for private meetings of his nonprofit political news foundation. It may be made available for community events.

“We certainly want to continue the castle’s role in the community,” Brimelow said. “I would like to put up a Christmas tree, but I understand the plastic dragon with a candy cane is very popular!” he said about the ornamentation put on top of the castle annually.

The castle has been a beloved part of the landscape since the 1880s. The English-Norman structure, a national and West Virginia registered historical landmark, was built by Colonel Samuel Taylor Suit between 1885 and 1891.

When he was 46, Colonel Suit met and fell in love with Rosa Pelham, the 17-year-old daughter of Congressman Charles Pelham of Alabama. He agreed to build a home overlooking the town of Bath. It was first known as the Samuel Taylor Suit cottage in the spa town full of cottages.

Colonel Suit hired architect A.B. Mullett, who had designed such buildings as the U.S. State Department Building, the U.S. Treasury Building, the old San Francisco Mint and the old New York Post Office. The castle’s foundation was laid in 1885.

The lot was part of the original Fruit Hill Farm owned before the Civil War by John Strother of the Berkeley Springs Hotel. About 100 German masons worked on the castle until its completion in 1891. Built of silica sandstone, each stone was hand cut from the local area and carried to the site by horse and wagon.

According to www.berkeleysprings.com, the first description of it as a castle was in 1886 in the “Mercury” and the 1888 “Martinsburg Independent.” The castle has 13 rooms plus a basement dungeon, which was popular during ghost tours. The great hall has a high ceiling, hardwood floor and stone fireplaces at each end.

A pine-paneled dining room on the main floor also has a fireplace. A wide stairway curves up to second-floor bedrooms and a paneled library. A narrow staircase leads to the turreted rooftop trimmed with battlements and offering a view of the town. Three crosses are sunk into the stone walls of the turret.

Castle ownership changed hands a few times in the early to mid-1900s, and during that period, the castle was used for various events such as Pasttime Club dances in 1924, a shop and retreat for artists and writers in 1929 and Friday night dances as the Old Castle Club in 1936.

From 1938-1954, Dr. Ward Keesecker used the castle and surrounding land for Monte-Vita, a summer camp for boys.

In 1954, Walter Bird purchased the castle and opened it up to the public as a museum. The castle remained open until 1999, when its contents were sold. The castle went on the auction block, and Andrew Gosline purchased it in 2002.

Gosline brought the castle back to the glamour of Rosa’s time and used it as a residence. He opened it up at times for tours and charitable events. It was also used as a wedding venue. He passed away in December 2014, and his heirs listed it for sale in 2018.

The castle was then purchased by VDARE and Brimelow, a former editor and journalist at publications like “Forbes Magazine,” “Fortune,” “Market Watch” and “National Review.” He is also the author of “The Wall Street Gurus: How You Can Profit From Investment Letters.”

The VDARE Foundation’s mission, according to its website, is “education on two main issues: First, the unsustainability of current US immigration policy and second, the “National Question,” which is the viability of the US as a nation-state.”

Reaction on social media was mixed about VDARE’s purchase of the castle.

“We’re a charity,” Peter Brimelow said. “We have no immediate plans to move the VDARE Foundation to Berkley Springs, although we do hope our family will come down as often as possible. It’s so delightful. Apart from local charity events, weddings, etc., we’ll probably just have dinners for people. We aim to be quiet, good neighbors. We absolutely will not have marches, demonstrations, rallies, tiki torch parades or anything like that. We’ve never been involved in that sort of thing.”

Lydia said the property represents the perfect combination of refinement and wilderness, the “twin beauties of America’s cultural and natural resources.”

“In line with VDARE.com’s mission of being the voice for the historic American nation, it is our hope that this property will come to represent a first major step toward greater shared knowledge about the nation’s past, present and future,” she said. “The foundation values the strengthening of regional identities and local pride and the protection and celebration of America’s national heritage. This castle does both.”
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Keys to Berkeley Springs castle change hands
By Tricia Lynn Strader For The Journal Mar 7, 2020 

Journal photo by Tricia Lynn Strader

BERKELEY SPRINGS — The iconic 19th-century castle on the hill in Berkeley Springs has been sold.

Berkeley Springs Castle LLC sold the castle for $1.4 million to VDARE, a nonprofit based in Litchfield, Connecticut. The keys to the castle were turned over to VDARE founder Peter Brimelow and his wife, Lydia, on Feb. 21.

Brimelow said in an interview they plan to use the site for the family, as office space and for private meetings of his nonprofit political news foundation. It may be made available for community events.

“We certainly want to continue the castle’s role in the community,” Brimelow said. “I would like to put up a Christmas tree, but I understand the plastic dragon with a candy cane is very popular!” he said about the ornamentation put on top of the castle annually.

The castle has been a beloved part of the landscape since the 1880s. The English-Norman structure, a national and West Virginia registered historical landmark, was built by Colonel Samuel Taylor Suit between 1885 and 1891.

When he was 46, Colonel Suit met and fell in love with Rosa Pelham, the 17-year-old daughter of Congressman Charles Pelham of Alabama. He agreed to build a home overlooking the town of Bath. It was first known as the Samuel Taylor Suit cottage in the spa town full of cottages.

Colonel Suit hired architect A.B. Mullett, who had designed such buildings as the U.S. State Department Building, the U.S. Treasury Building, the old San Francisco Mint and the old New York Post Office. The castle’s foundation was laid in 1885.

The lot was part of the original Fruit Hill Farm owned before the Civil War by John Strother of the Berkeley Springs Hotel. About 100 German masons worked on the castle until its completion in 1891. Built of silica sandstone, each stone was hand cut from the local area and carried to the site by horse and wagon.

According to www.berkeleysprings.com, the first description of it as a castle was in 1886 in the “Mercury” and the 1888 “Martinsburg Independent.” The castle has 13 rooms plus a basement dungeon, which was popular during ghost tours. The great hall has a high ceiling, hardwood floor and stone fireplaces at each end.

A pine-paneled dining room on the main floor also has a fireplace. A wide stairway curves up to second-floor bedrooms and a paneled library. A narrow staircase leads to the turreted rooftop trimmed with battlements and offering a view of the town. Three crosses are sunk into the stone walls of the turret.

Castle ownership changed hands a few times in the early to mid-1900s, and during that period, the castle was used for various events such as Pasttime Club dances in 1924, a shop and retreat for artists and writers in 1929 and Friday night dances as the Old Castle Club in 1936.

From 1938-1954, Dr. Ward Keesecker used the castle and surrounding land for Monte-Vita, a summer camp for boys.

In 1954, Walter Bird purchased the castle and opened it up to the public as a museum. The castle remained open until 1999, when its contents were sold. The castle went on the auction block, and Andrew Gosline purchased it in 2002.

Gosline brought the castle back to the glamour of Rosa’s time and used it as a residence. He opened it up at times for tours and charitable events. It was also used as a wedding venue. He passed away in December 2014, and his heirs listed it for sale in 2018.

The castle was then purchased by VDARE and Brimelow, a former editor and journalist at publications like “Forbes Magazine,” “Fortune,” “Market Watch” and “National Review.” He is also the author of “The Wall Street Gurus: How You Can Profit From Investment Letters.”

The VDARE Foundation’s mission, according to its website, is “education on two main issues: First, the unsustainability of current US immigration policy and second, the “National Question,” which is the viability of the US as a nation-state.”

Reaction on social media was mixed about VDARE’s purchase of the castle.

“We’re a charity,” Peter Brimelow said. “We have no immediate plans to move the VDARE Foundation to Berkley Springs, although we do hope our family will come down as often as possible. It’s so delightful. Apart from local charity events, weddings, etc., we’ll probably just have dinners for people. We aim to be quiet, good neighbors. We absolutely will not have marches, demonstrations, rallies, tiki torch parades or anything like that. We’ve never been involved in that sort of thing.”

Lydia said the property represents the perfect combination of refinement and wilderness, the “twin beauties of America’s cultural and natural resources.”

“In line with VDARE.com’s mission of being the voice for the historic American nation, it is our hope that this property will come to represent a first major step toward greater shared knowledge about the nation’s past, present and future,” she said. “The foundation values the strengthening of regional identities and local pride and the protection and celebration of America’s national heritage. This castle does both.”

Comment on Facebook

So, Tricia Lynn Strader, are you 1) lazy, 2) naive, 3) easily played, or 4) a sympathizer? This certainly isn't journalism. You also have the photo credit... Holding the keys to the Berkeley Springs Castle. Are you kidding? Have you never stumbled across a metaphor in your life? What exactly were you thinking?

As long as “America’s national heritage” isn’t meant to mean just the white people agenda; white people who took over this country from the Natives who lived and thrived here for thousands of years before being slaughtered and oppressed for the manifest destiny ideology. Immigration is indeed an issue that needs reform, but this is a country founded on immigration. It wasn’t founded with legal immigration like we want to have now, but illegal immigration where when the Natives opposed their lands and resources being taken and abused they were killed and/or irrevocably repressed and oppressed. I really hope this group and even more the individuals who will inhabit/visit the castle understand that any assertions that borders need be closed, or that foreigners seeking a life in America should be stopped because those already here need to keep America great is hypocrisy in the most fundamental and obvious ways.

From Wikipedia-The SPLC describes VDARE as "an anti-immigration hate website" which "regularly publishes articles by prominent white nationalists, race scientists and anti-Semites".

Look at those temps over the next 7 days!
This Week's Forecast
DAY TEMP
FRI 52° 35°
SAT 51° 28°
SUN 64° 34°
MON 71° 45°
TUE 66° 40°
WED 61° 40°
THU 59° 41°
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Look at those temps over the next 7 days!
This Weeks Forecast
DAY              TEMP
FRI                52° 35°
SAT               51° 28°
SUN              64° 34°
MON             71° 45°
TUE               66° 40°
WED              61° 40°
THU              59° 41°

Comment on Facebook

Almost Heaven! Wish I was there.

I am moving....

Elliott N Rosa Miller

Sheriff thankful for MPD car donation to Morgan County Deputy Reserves

BERKELEY SPRINGS — Morgan County Sheriff K.C. Bohrer said the deputy reserves has received another vehicle thanks to a recent donation by the Martinsburg Police Department.

In a press release, Bohrer said MPD donated a third car to him, which will be used for the the Morgan County Deputy Reserves.

“Chief Maury Richards, Deputy Chief George Swartwood and (I) have been friends and colleagues for several years,” the press release said. “Chief Richards and Deputy Chief Swartwood have continued to support (me) and the Morgan County Reserve program with the blessings of the City of Martinsburg.”

Two Dodge Durangos and one Chevrolet Caprice were donated in the past several months at no charge. These vehicles were taken out of active police service and are in good condition with high mileage. They come fully equipped with emergency lighting.

There are currently 17 reserves deputies, with two more individuals who have applied to the program. Three reserve deputies are currently attending the Eastern Panhandle Deputy Reserve Academy.

“These vehicles will be used by our reserve force to: Respond to assist officers at traffic crashes, natural disasters such as flooding, provide security at school and other events in Morgan County and to direct traffic at parades and the annual Apple Butter Festival,” Sheriff Bohrer said.

“The sheriff’s department relies heavily on our Deputy Reserves to provide non-sworn services to the citizens of Morgan County when needed and creates a community policing effort with citizens being able to help and participate assisting their sheriff’s department.”

Sheriff Bohrer has obtained five vehicles donated to the reserve program in the past three years, replacing several vehicles that were unserviceable. One was donated by Sheriff Bohrer’s parents (A.C. and Shirley) to the reserve program.
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Sheriff thankful for MPD car donation to Morgan County Deputy Reserves

BERKELEY SPRINGS — Morgan County Sheriff K.C. Bohrer said the deputy reserves has received another vehicle thanks to a recent donation by the Martinsburg Police Department.

In a press release, Bohrer said MPD donated a third car to him, which will be used for the the Morgan County Deputy Reserves.

“Chief Maury Richards, Deputy Chief George Swartwood and (I) have been friends and colleagues for several years,” the press release said. “Chief Richards and Deputy Chief Swartwood have continued to support (me) and the Morgan County Reserve program with the blessings of the City of Martinsburg.”

Two Dodge Durangos and one Chevrolet Caprice were donated in the past several months at no charge. These vehicles were taken out of active police service and are in good condition with high mileage. They come fully equipped with emergency lighting.

There are currently 17 reserves deputies, with two more individuals who have applied to the program. Three reserve deputies are currently attending the Eastern Panhandle Deputy Reserve Academy.

“These vehicles will be used by our reserve force to: Respond to assist officers at traffic crashes, natural disasters such as flooding, provide security at school and other events in Morgan County and to direct traffic at parades and the annual Apple Butter Festival,” Sheriff Bohrer said.

“The sheriff’s department relies heavily on our Deputy Reserves to provide non-sworn services to the citizens of Morgan County when needed and creates a community policing effort with citizens being able to help and participate assisting their sheriff’s department.”

Sheriff Bohrer has obtained five vehicles donated to the reserve program in the past three years, replacing several vehicles that were unserviceable. One was donated by Sheriff Bohrer’s parents (A.C. and Shirley) to the reserve program.

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness
Berkeley Springs 304.258.1300
Hedgesville 304.754.6000
Inwood 304.229.1010
Martinsburg 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown 301.790.0202
Spring Mills 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness
Berkeley Springs        304.258.1300
Hedgesville                 304.754.6000
Inwood                         304.229.1010
Martinsburg                304.267.0866
North Hagerstown     301.790.9999
Shepherdstown          304.876.1000
South Hagerstown     301.790.0202
Spring Mills                 304.274.0123

Are falls preventable?
Most falls result from a number of risk factors including changes in your body that increase your risk for a fall, things we do or don’t do that increase our fall risk, and hazards in our home or community.

In order to prevent falls you can exercise to improve your strength and balance, have your doctor review your medicines, have your vision checked, and make your home safer.

When starting an exercise program talk to your doctor and make sure classes are for your age group and or ability level. Identify and eliminate fall hazards in your home. Medications may cause side effects that make you dizzy and increase your fall risk. Be sure you can read your labels and ask for an annual medication review. Ask for annual eye exam after the age of 50. Multifocal lenses may blur or distort your vision looking down, also increasing your fall risk. Check your blood pressure regularly, if you get dizzy when you stand up see your doctor and have them look at your blood pressure medication as it could relate to a fall risk.
Rankin Physical Therapy wants you to be safe and fall free.
Remember to always ask for Rankin Physical Therapy
... See MoreSee Less

Are falls preventable? 
Most falls result from a number of risk factors including changes in your body that increase your risk for a fall, things we do or don’t do that increase our fall risk, and hazards in our home or community.

In order to prevent falls you can exercise to improve your strength and balance, have your doctor review your medicines, have your vision checked, and make your home safer.

When starting an exercise program talk to your doctor and make sure classes are for your age group and or ability level. Identify and eliminate fall hazards in your home. Medications may cause side effects that make you dizzy and increase your fall risk. Be sure you can read your labels and ask for an annual medication review. Ask for annual eye exam after the age of 50. Multifocal lenses may blur or distort your vision looking down, also increasing your fall risk. Check your blood pressure regularly, if you get dizzy when you stand up see your doctor and have them look at your blood pressure medication as it could relate to a fall risk.
Rankin Physical Therapy wants you to be safe and fall free.
Remember to always ask for Rankin Physical Therapy

Happy Leap Year Day - it’s an extra day in the year... make it count! ... See MoreSee Less

Happy Leap Year Day - it’s an extra day in the year... make it count!

Washington County officials brief Hancock-area residents on NextGen 911
By Dave McMillion davem@herald-mail.com
Published Tue Feb 25, 2020 8:45 PM EST
HANCOCK — Although it will probably be at least a year before the system is in place, Washington County officials are beginning to hold community meetings to help people understand the NextGen 911 service. NextGen 911 will allow 911 dispatchers to receive voice, photos, videos and text messages, and improve the ability of officials to manage call overloads, natural disasters and take better advantage of cellphone technology to pinpoint a caller’s location, county officials said. There are at least a dozen fire districts across the county, and officials are planning to have community meetings in the districts to explain the new service and help them understand how they might be affected by address changes. Officials held one of the community meetings Tuesday at Hancock Town Hall. To allow the new system to operate efficiently, officials said they need to eliminate duplicate street names, which can be confusing to first responders trying to find an address. During the meeting, which attracted about 30 people, three stations were set up where officials explained changes they are proposing to four streets in town. One of those streets is Maryland Avenue, which is bisected by Interstate 70. County officials want to change one of the segments of Maryland Avenue to a different name because it could cause confusion to first responders trying to find a house on the street, said R. David Hays, Washington County’s emergency-services director. Hays said navigating from one section of Maryland Avenue to another is not a big deal, but if it ends up adding a minute or two to a response time, it could be critical to a caller complaining that he can’t breathe. To illustrate the point, Hays asked those in attendance to think about holding their breath one minute. “That’s reality,” he said. But convincing some town residents for the need for the service has been challenging. Some complained Tuesday about having to change addresses on their driver’s licenses and other legal documents. They said the town’s address system has served the town just fine over the years. Bud Gudmundson, the county’s geographic information systems manager, said he understands the system can be disruptive. But “it’s to protect life and property,” he said. Mark McKee cut his own unnamed road to his home and others off Resley Road outside of town. McKee said he doesn’t see the need to name the road since there already are numbers for the house lots.
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Washington County officials brief Hancock-area residents on NextGen 911
By Dave McMillion davem@herald-mail.com
Published Tue Feb 25, 2020 8:45 PM EST
HANCOCK — Although it will probably be at least a year before the system is in place, Washington County officials are beginning to hold community meetings to help people understand the NextGen 911 service. NextGen 911 will allow 911 dispatchers to receive voice, photos, videos and text messages, and improve the ability of officials to manage call overloads, natural disasters and take better advantage of cellphone technology to pinpoint a caller’s location, county officials said. There are at least a dozen fire districts across the county, and officials are planning to have community meetings in the districts to explain the new service and help them understand how they might be affected by address changes. Officials held one of the community meetings Tuesday at Hancock Town Hall. To allow the new system to operate efficiently, officials said they need to eliminate duplicate street names, which can be confusing to first responders trying to find an address. During the meeting, which attracted about 30 people, three stations were set up where officials explained changes they are proposing to four streets in town. One of those streets is Maryland Avenue, which is bisected by Interstate 70. County officials want to change one of the segments of Maryland Avenue to a different name because it could cause confusion to first responders trying to find a house on the street, said R. David Hays, Washington County’s emergency-services director. Hays said navigating from one section of Maryland Avenue to another is not a big deal, but if it ends up adding a minute or two to a response time, it could be critical to a caller complaining that he can’t breathe. To illustrate the point, Hays asked those in attendance to think about holding their breath one minute. “That’s reality,” he said. But convincing some town residents for the need for the service has been challenging. Some complained Tuesday about having to change addresses on their driver’s licenses and other legal documents. They said the town’s address system has served the town just fine over the years. Bud Gudmundson, the county’s geographic information systems manager, said he understands the system can be disruptive. But “it’s to protect life and property,” he said. Mark McKee cut his own unnamed road to his home and others off Resley Road outside of town. McKee said he doesn’t see the need to name the road since there already are numbers for the house lots.

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123

Comment on Facebook

Great bunch of people there at Berkeley Springs.

America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic. Consider that in 2012 alone, health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid pain medication, enough for every American adult to have their own bottle of pills.

Opioids, responsibly dosed, are an appropriate part of medical treatment in some situations. But they carry significant risks, including depression, withdrawal symptoms, overdose, and addiction. The statistics are scary:

As many as 1 in 4 people who receive prescription opioids long-term for noncancer pain struggle with addiction. Every day, more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for misusing prescription opioids;
People who are addicted to prescription opioids are 40 times more likely to become addicted to heroin; and 78 people die every day from an opioid-related overdose.

To address this national health crisis, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued guidelines in March 2016 urging providers to reduce opioid prescribing in favor of safe, nondrug alternatives such as physical therapy for chronic pain conditions, including low back pain, hip and knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia. In August 2016, the Surgeon General sent a letter to every physician in the country asking for their help to solve the problem.

Meanwhile, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) launched a national public awareness campaign to educate consumers about the risks of opioids and the safe alternative of physical therapy for pain management.

A safe way to manage and treat pain

Physical therapists treat pain and improve function through movement and exercise without the risky side effects of opioids. A physical therapist's individualized, hands-on approach engages the patient, making her or him an active participant in her or his own recovery.

Patients should choose physical therapist treatment instead of opioids when...

The risks of opioids outweigh the rewards. CDC experts say that opioids should not be considered as first-line or routine therapy for chronic pain. Even when opioids are prescribed, the CDC recommends that patients receive "the lowest effective dosage," and opioids "should be combined" with nonopioid therapies, such as physical therapy.

Pain or function problems are related to low back pain, hip or knee osteoarthritis, or fibromyalgia. The CDC cites "high-quality evidence" supporting exercise as part of a physical therapist treatment plan for these chronic pain conditions.

Pain lasts at least 90 days. At this point, pain is considered "chronic," and the risks for continued opioid use increase. The CDC says that "clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient."

APTA's #ChoosePT initiative is raising awareness about the dangers of prescription opioids and the safe, nondrug alternative for pain management provided by physical therapists. Visit MoveForwardPT.com for information to help you decide if physical therapist treatment is right for you.
... See MoreSee Less

America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic. Consider that in 2012 alone, health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid pain medication, enough for every American adult to have their own bottle of pills.

Opioids, responsibly dosed, are an appropriate part of medical treatment in some situations. But they carry significant risks, including depression, withdrawal symptoms, overdose, and addiction. The statistics are scary:

As many as 1 in 4 people who receive prescription opioids long-term for noncancer pain struggle with addiction.  Every day, more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for misusing prescription opioids;
People who are addicted to prescription opioids are 40 times more likely to become addicted to heroin; and 78 people die every day from an opioid-related overdose.

To address this national health crisis, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued guidelines in March 2016 urging providers to reduce opioid prescribing in favor of safe, nondrug alternatives such as physical therapy for chronic pain conditions, including low back pain, hip and knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia. In August 2016, the Surgeon General sent a letter to every physician in the country asking for their help to solve the problem.

Meanwhile, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) launched a national public awareness campaign to educate consumers about the risks of opioids and the safe alternative of physical therapy for pain management.

A safe way to manage and treat pain

Physical therapists treat pain and improve function through movement and exercise without the risky side effects of opioids. A physical therapists individualized, hands-on approach engages the patient, making her or him an active participant in her or his own recovery.

Patients should choose physical therapist treatment instead of opioids when...

The risks of opioids outweigh the rewards. CDC experts say that opioids should not be considered as first-line or routine therapy for chronic pain. Even when opioids are prescribed, the CDC recommends that patients receive the lowest effective dosage, and opioids should be combined with nonopioid therapies, such as physical therapy.

Pain or function problems are related to low back pain, hip or knee osteoarthritis, or fibromyalgia. The CDC cites high-quality evidence supporting exercise as part of a physical therapist treatment plan for these chronic pain conditions.

Pain lasts at least 90 days. At this point, pain is considered chronic, and the risks for continued opioid use increase. The CDC says that clinicians should consider opioid therapy only if expected benefits for both pain and function are anticipated to outweigh risks to the patient.

APTAs #ChoosePT initiative is raising awareness about the dangers of prescription opioids and the safe, nondrug alternative for pain management provided by physical therapists. Visit http://MoveForwardPT.com for information to help you decide if physical therapist treatment is right for you.

Hancock briefs
By Mike Lewis mlewis@herald-mail.com
Published Fri Feb 14, 2020 3:00 PM EST
Main Street leader cites 'sure bet'

HANCOCK — Some Hancock officials and citizens saw the video portion of the town's entry for HGTV's "Home Town Takeover" that will air in 2021.

The 5-minute video was shown during Wednesday's town council meeting. It includes scenes from the town, comments from civic and business leaders and some music from the Hancock Middle-Senior High School Band.

The television show will be hosted by the husband-and-wife team of Ben and Erin Napier, who already lead the network’s “Home Town” home-renovation show. According to the HGTV website, the town makeover will include the rehab of individual family homes, as well as the revitalization of public spaces such as parks, local diners or restaurants and outdoor recreation areas.

The new Main Street Hancock group spearheaded the town's entry.

J Loren, president of Main Street Hagerstown, said he was pleased with the results. He thanked those who have been working with the group and cautioned against placing a lot of hope on a TV-driven revitalization.

"What would be a sure bet is betting on us, our community," he said.

Council supports MARC extension

HANCOCK — The Hancock Town Council has added its voice to those who support extending MARC commuter train service.

The idea is to extend the line that now runs from Washington, D.C., to Martinsburg, W.Va., further west into northern Morgan County, W.Va. The proposed stop would be right across the Potomac River from Hancock.

At its meeting Wednesday, the council unanimously adopted a resolution "to demonstrate support for the MARC train extension." The resolution notes that an Appalachian Regional Commission study in 2000 found "positive results" for the extension.

At the meeting, Hancock Mayor Ralph Salvagno said the resolution did not obligate the town to take any action or spend money.

Council members Timothy Boyer, Ronald Lanehart Jr., Leo Murray and Tim Smith voted in favor.

Gillespie takes workforce job in Hancock

HANCOCK — An adult education veteran has been named economic and workforce development program manager in Hancock.

Amy Gillespie, who started work on Feb. 3, recently married and moved from Connecticut to Hagerstown. Town Manager Joe Gilbert introduced her at Wednesday's town council meeting.

"I was a corporate trainer for 25 years," Gillespie said in a brief interview Wednesday.

She said she then ran a nonprofit, the United Labor Agency, for about a decade.

Hancock's new program is funded through a $75,000 grant from the Rural Maryland Council, Gilbert said. Originally the town partnered with Allegany County to apply for a grant to create an incubator for new businesses. Allegany County received some additional funding and proceeded with the idea, Gilbert said. When Hancock was notified a few months ago that it had received the grant, the need had changed.

Gilbert said he received permission to use the money for the new workforce effort, because it is related to economic development.

Gillespie's main responsibility will be working with area colleges and others to offer courses that will strengthen the area’s workforce skills.

The goal is to help residents prepare for higher-paying jobs and attract businesses to the town.

— Mike Lewis
... See MoreSee Less

Hancock briefs
By Mike Lewis mlewis@herald-mail.com
Published Fri Feb 14, 2020 3:00 PM EST
Main Street leader cites sure bet

HANCOCK — Some Hancock officials and citizens saw the video portion of the towns entry for HGTVs Home Town Takeover that will air in 2021.

The 5-minute video was shown during Wednesdays town council meeting. It includes scenes from the town, comments from civic and business leaders and some music from the Hancock Middle-Senior High School Band.

The television show will be hosted by the husband-and-wife team of Ben and Erin Napier, who already lead the network’s “Home Town” home-renovation show. According to the HGTV website, the town makeover will include the rehab of individual family homes, as well as the revitalization of public spaces such as parks, local diners or restaurants and outdoor recreation areas.

The new Main Street Hancock group spearheaded the towns entry.

J Loren, president of Main Street Hagerstown, said he was pleased with the results. He thanked those who have been working with the group and cautioned against placing a lot of hope on a TV-driven revitalization.

What would be a sure bet is betting on us, our community, he said.

Council supports MARC extension

HANCOCK — The Hancock Town Council has added its voice to those who support extending MARC commuter train service.

The idea is to extend the line that now runs from Washington, D.C., to Martinsburg, W.Va., further west into northern Morgan County, W.Va. The proposed stop would be right across the Potomac River from Hancock.

At its meeting Wednesday, the council unanimously adopted a resolution to demonstrate support for the MARC train extension. The resolution notes that an Appalachian Regional Commission study in 2000 found positive results for the extension.

At the meeting, Hancock Mayor Ralph Salvagno said the resolution did not obligate the town to take any action or spend money.

Council members Timothy Boyer, Ronald Lanehart Jr., Leo Murray and Tim Smith voted in favor.

Gillespie takes workforce job in Hancock

HANCOCK — An adult education veteran has been named economic and workforce development program manager in Hancock.

Amy Gillespie, who started work on Feb. 3, recently married and moved from Connecticut to Hagerstown. Town Manager Joe Gilbert introduced her at Wednesdays town council meeting.

I was a corporate trainer for 25 years, Gillespie said in a brief interview Wednesday.

She said she then ran a nonprofit, the United Labor Agency, for about a decade.

Hancocks new program is funded through a $75,000 grant from the Rural Maryland Council, Gilbert said. Originally the town partnered with Allegany County to apply for a grant to create an incubator for new businesses. Allegany County received some additional funding and proceeded with the idea, Gilbert said. When Hancock was notified a few months ago that it had received the grant, the need had changed.

Gilbert said he received permission to use the money for the new workforce effort, because it is related to economic development.

Gillespies main responsibility will be working with area colleges and others to offer courses that will strengthen the area’s workforce skills.

The goal is to help residents prepare for higher-paying jobs and attract businesses to the town.

— Mike Lewis

Rankin Physical Therapy has 6 tickets to give away to the men’s and women’s games tomorrow evening (Wednesday) at the Butcher Center. The Women’s Game is at 530pm followed by the Men’s game. Tickets are good for both games. If you would like to go, all you have to do is like one of our clinic FB pages & let me know. GO RAMS! 🏀 ... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy has 6 tickets to give away to the men’s and women’s games tomorrow evening (Wednesday) at the Butcher Center.  The Women’s Game is at 530pm followed by the Men’s game. Tickets are good for both games.  If you would like to go, all you have to do is like one of our clinic FB pages & let me know. GO RAMS! 🏀

Comment on Facebook

Wish these were for last Saturday- lol- I will have to look at your page before we go again. This is awesome that you are doing this!!

What our patients are saying about us.

Easy and efficient to a gain appointments! Very caring staff! Great therapy center and easy to access. Highly recommend the Rankin Physical Therapy and Fitness Center.
Mark
... See MoreSee Less

What our patients are saying about us.

Easy and efficient to a gain appointments! Very caring staff! Great therapy center and easy to access. Highly recommend the Rankin Physical Therapy and Fitness Center.
Mark

Comment on Facebook

Great people and a great facility.

Martinsburg, West Virginia ... See MoreSee Less

Morgan County police seek public's help in home invasion probe
Published Mon Jan 27, 2020 10:00 PM EST
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. — The Morgan County Sheriff’s Department is asking for the public’s help in gathering information about a November home invasion on Fulton Road in which a female was forced to the ground at gunpoint. On Nov. 1 at about 7:15 a.m., the female heard her rear door open, Sheriff K.C. Bohrer wrote in a news release. She saw a male standing in her hallway with a gun, the release said. The assailant forced the female to the floor at gunpoint and started going through her home, Bohrer wrote. Items stolen included money, silver and gold, and silver dollars. The female wasn’t injured. The assailant is a white male who is about 6 feet, 1 inch tall with an average build. He was wearing all black clothing, including a ski mask, a hoodie-type upper garment and gloves. He wasn’t wearing shoes. Fulton Road is off Householder Road east of Berkeley Springs. Anyone with information about the home invasion may call the sheriff’s department at 304-258-1067. — Dave McMillion
... See MoreSee Less

Morgan County police seek publics help in home invasion probe
Published Mon Jan 27, 2020 10:00 PM EST
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. — The Morgan County Sheriff’s Department is asking for the public’s help in gathering information about a November home invasion on Fulton Road in which a female was forced to the ground at gunpoint. On Nov. 1 at about 7:15 a.m., the female heard her rear door open, Sheriff K.C. Bohrer wrote in a news release. She saw a male standing in her hallway with a gun, the release said. The assailant forced the female to the floor at gunpoint and started going through her home, Bohrer wrote. Items stolen included money, silver and gold, and silver dollars. The female wasn’t injured. The assailant is a white male who is about 6 feet, 1 inch tall with an average build. He was wearing all black clothing, including a ski mask, a hoodie-type upper garment and gloves. He wasn’t wearing shoes. Fulton Road is off Householder Road east of Berkeley Springs. Anyone with information about the home invasion may call the sheriff’s department at 304-258-1067. — Dave McMillion

Comment on Facebook

Jesse Windsor Paul Klaasse

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 304.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Bill targeting 2018 W.Va. candidate residency controversy halted
By Matthew Umstead mumstead@herald-mail.com
Published Mon Jan 20, 2020 6:30 PM EST
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. — Legislative action on a bill that aims to strengthen residency requirements for candidates for state or local elections in West Virginia was halted Monday by leadership in the House of Delegates. House Bill 4096, which was up for final consideration Monday in the 100-seat House, was moved to the inactive house calendar by the powerful House Rules Committee just before the start of the floor session. Del. Larry D. Kump, R-Berkeley/Morgan, the bill’s lead sponsor, said in a telephone interview that the move to take the bill off the special calendar was concerning, but noted that he wasn’t panicked about the bill’s fate. Kump, along with Rules Committee members Del. Jason Barrett, D-Berkeley, and Del. Eric Householder, R-Berkeley, said they weren’t told why action was halted on the bill. Monday was the 13th day of the West Virginia Legislature’s regular 60-day session. Kump said the introduction of HB 4096 stems from a residency controversy involving Tally Reed, Kump’s opponent in the 2018 GOP primary election in the 59th House District. If adopted, HB 4096 would add a new section to state code requiring candidates to reside in the district they seek to represent. The bill includes a definition for “principal residence” to mean the place where the candidate lives, including both physical residency and an intent to remain in the state, district, county or municipality. In 2018, a couple of 59th District residents filed legal action in court, seeking a declaration that Reed was ineligible for the election due, in part, to the one-year residency requirement in the West Virginia Constitution. Reed disputed the residency claims as a politically motivated distraction to voters. The constitution prohibits individuals from serving as state senators or delegates if they haven’t been a resident within the district or county from which they are elected for one year before the candidate’s election. The residents who challenged Reed’s eligibility cited more than a dozen exhibits in their petition, including property records, voting history and campaign materials linking the candidate to a Berkeley Springs residence in the neighboring 58th District. While Reed’s certificate of candidacy announcement filed Jan. 25, 2018, with the secretary of state’s office indicated her home address was 11348 Martinsburg Road in Hedgesville, the address listed on Reed’s voter registration before Jan. 3, 2018, was 4253 Martinsburg Road in Berkeley Springs, according to information obtained from the secretary of state’s office and the petition. Kump, who defeated Reed in the May 2018 primary election, faces opposition in this May’s Republican primary by Reed’s husband, Ken Reed. In determining residency, the new code section proposed in HB 4096 states facts that might demonstrate the principal residence of a person may include: • The physical character of the person’s residence • Time spent at the residence • A candidate’s reasons for residency • Whether the person intends on returning permanently to another residence outside of the jurisdiction in the future • Whether the person obtains a license to operate a vehicle in the state • Whether the person registers a vehicle or other property at that address • Addresses listed on the person’s vehicle and voter-registration cards and driver’s license • The address where a person receives state or federal benefits • Where the person pays property or income taxes.
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Unfortunately, no surprises here. Personally I think no candidate should be able to use their business address (unless they sleep in the back room) or a PO Box address for candidate requirements. What could possibly be the legitimate motivation for halting residency requirements? How can the public believe any candidate that would start their run for public office with a lie?

Hi Barb. There is a constitutional requirement that House of Delegates members live in their district, and do so for a full year before their election. A business address or PO Box can not be used under current law. The Kump bill would not affect the residency requirement of any House of Delegate district.

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
North Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
South Hagerstown - 301.790.0202
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123