Berkley County

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At Rankin Physical Therapy we put our patients' needs first. Visit our website, or stop by one of our 8 locations, to learn more about our services today!

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown (North) - 301.790.9999
Hagerstown (South) - Coming Soon
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

At Rankin Physical Therapy we put our patients needs first. Visit our website, or stop by one of our 8 locations, to learn more about our services today!

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown (North) - 301.790.9999
Hagerstown (South) - Coming Soon
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123

Comment on Facebook

Love this post!

We are new to the area and looking for someone who can deliver stone milling’s for our driveway

I’ve looked on Angie’s list and the phone numbers for almost all the places I’ve contacted or disconnected.

Can you recommend any services in the area. I need two truckloads of milling stone delivered to our campsite between now and Friday

Thank you,
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Thank you everyone, I was able to find someone and have them deliver today!!! Thx Pentoney Brothers

Bobby Owens 304-279-5106

Pentoney Brothers

Mark Pierce

Shane Pentoney

Shane Pentoney!

Allen Truax

View more comments

2 weeks ago

Berkeley Springs, West Virginia

My husband stayed in a house for a bit as a child in Berkeley Springs. I'm trying to find out some history on the house. Can anyone help me? I believe the address is 302 Warren St. I am attaching a picture of the home. ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

The house in the attachment was originally owned by Lilly Rockwell. Sold to Woolbright in the 70s. I grew up in the red brick house in the background … 1949 .. 1996. The picture you are showing in the Frank Heiner house which is now owned by Sheldon Akers. Jack

I think I know this house. Its beside a church and across from a funeral home I believe. Drive by it nearly every day

It belongs to Sheldon and. Christal Akers

www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=117314 Location. 39° 37.422′ N, 78° 13.687′ W. Marker is in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia, in Morgan County. Marker is at the intersection of Warren Street and South Green Street on Warren Street. Marker is at or near this postal address: 302 Warren Street, Berkeley Springs WV 25411, United States of America.

Looks like its right next door to Lot 12 Restaurant.

Only thing I could find on the house is attached

Christal Akers

Thank you for sharing

View more comments

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123

NATIONAL CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE DAY
On August 4th, National Chocolate Chip Cookie Day gives us an opportunity to dunk American’s #1 favorite cookie. Whether yours are homemade or storebought, pour a glass of milk and enjoy.
... See MoreSee Less

NATIONAL CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE DAY
On August 4th, National Chocolate Chip Cookie Day gives us an opportunity to dunk American’s #1 favorite cookie. Whether yours are homemade or storebought, pour a glass of milk and enjoy.

NATIONAL WATERMELON DAY
National Watermelon Day on August 3rd recognizes the refreshing summertime treat enjoyed at picnics and fairs! Watermelon is 92% water, which is why it is so satisfying in the summer heat.
... See MoreSee Less

NATIONAL WATERMELON DAY
National Watermelon Day on August 3rd recognizes the refreshing summertime treat enjoyed at picnics and fairs! Watermelon is 92% water, which is why it is so satisfying in the summer heat.

NATIONAL WATER BALLOON DAY
Fill ’em up! The first Friday in August ushers in National Water Balloon Day just in time for the hottest days of summer!
Pop, throw, splash, or just squish! What kid or adult doesn’t enjoy a water balloon in the hot summer? Since Edgar Ellington invented the waterproof sock in 1950, backyards haven’t been the same.
... See MoreSee Less

NATIONAL WATER BALLOON DAY
Fill ’em up! The first Friday in August ushers in National Water Balloon Day just in time for the hottest days of summer!
Pop, throw, splash, or just squish! What kid or adult doesn’t enjoy a water balloon in the hot summer? Since Edgar Ellington invented the waterproof sock in 1950, backyards haven’t been the same.

On August 1, National Girlfriends Day encourages women across the U.S. to get together and celebrate their special bond of friendship. ... See MoreSee Less

On August 1, National Girlfriends Day encourages women across the U.S. to get together and celebrate their special bond of friendship.

Make it a GREAT month! ... See MoreSee Less

Make it a GREAT month!

Comment on Facebook

This is my birthday month.😊

#physicaltherapy #RankinPT #Hagerstown #Hedgesville #BerkeleySprings #Martinsburg #SpringMills #Shepherdstown #Inwood ... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness Center

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123

July 31 - National Avocado Day
There are many reasons to celebrate the National Avocado Day. For one, avocados targeting insulin resistance with heart-healthy fats. They also fight Alzheimer’s with its Omega 3 fatty acids. Another avocado super power is preventing and repairing damage due to its source of Vitamins C, E and K.
Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness
... See MoreSee Less

July 31 - National Avocado Day 
There are many reasons to celebrate the National Avocado Day. For one, avocados targeting insulin resistance with heart-healthy fats. They also fight Alzheimer’s with its Omega 3 fatty acids. Another avocado super power is preventing and repairing damage due to its source of Vitamins C, E and K.
Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness

Let's take a minute and appreciate the good things today. Just because something minor may have gone wrong or "not quite right", you still have THE REST of the day to be grateful! ... See MoreSee Less

Lets take a minute and appreciate the good things today.  Just because something minor may have gone wrong or not quite right, you still have THE REST of the day to be grateful!

Comment on Facebook

Amen. Every day we are alive is a good day.

AMEN 🙏💕

Very true

Amen!

Amen

View more comments

4 weeks ago

Berkeley Springs, West Virginia

Berkley Springs, WV, Martinsburg, WV, Hancock, MD.

Our Einstein went missing from Fairview subdivision in Berkeley Springs, WV.

He is very timid and will most likely run if approached.

Please call 412 445 9397 or 717 977 8414 if found or spotted.
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Thank you

We live in the subdivision and will keep a close eye out for him 👍

4 weeks ago

Berkeley Springs, West Virginia

MORGAN COUNTY YOUTH PET SHOW, Saturday at 10:00 at the Morgan county expo.

Do you have a pet you adore? Do you and a pet look alike? Call the WVU extension office to register for the pet show. 304 258 8400.
... See MoreSee Less

If you are a athlete or active person and have an injury, Rankin Physical Therapy has Physical Therapists on staff that specialize in Sport Medicine that can get you get back in the game! Call us today!!!
Martinsburg 304.267.0866
Inwood 304.229.1010
Hedgesville 304.754.6000
Berkeley Springs 304.258.1300
Spring Mills 304.274.0123
Shepherdstown 304.876.1000
Hagerstown 301.790.9999
#RankinPT
... See MoreSee Less

If you are a athlete or active person and have an injury, Rankin Physical Therapy has Physical Therapists on staff that specialize in Sport Medicine that can get you get back in the game! Call us today!!!
Martinsburg              304.267.0866
Inwood                       304.229.1010
Hedgesville               304.754.6000
Berkeley Springs      304.258.1300
Spring Mills               304.274.0123
Shepherdstown        304.876.1000
Hagerstown              301.790.9999
#RankinPT

#MotivationMonday
Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness
... See MoreSee Less

#MotivationMonday
Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness

The heat is getting very DANGEROUS. If you don’t have a place to escape from the heat - you are welcome to come to a Rankin Physical Therapy / Fitness Center location to cool off in the AC and get some cold water to drink. Please be careful - the next couple days are going to be extremely hot!

It’s HOT – be careful out there

Mark Netherda

Summer is upon us! Besides the risk of painful sunburn – and skin cancer risks – the sun and heat also bring risks of heat-related illnesses.

Mild illnesses include simple dehydration (not enough water in your body from sweating), heat rash (also called prickly heat), temporary swelling of hands and feet, cramping of the large muscles, and heat related collapse or fainting.

While uncomfortable, these are rarely serious. This article focuses on the most serious of the heat related illnesses – heat exhaustion and life-threatening heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion occurs with strenuous exercise on hot days. It occurs most commonly in competing or practicing athletes and workers performing heavy labor. Signs of heat exhaustion include the inability to continue the activity, high body temperatures in the 101-104 degrees range and extreme weakness, often to the point of collapse. Sufferers usually sweat heavily, appear pale, have muscle and abdominal cramps, headaches, and sometimes with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. They do not have neurologic effects like abnormal behavior, seizures or altered consciousness.

Individuals should rest, laying down in a cool place (in shade or an air-conditioned setting). Any bulky clothing should be removed. Cool towels, showers or baths should be used as available to cool the person down. Chilled water or sports drinks should be given. If the person is vomiting or is too nauseated to drink, then evaluation at a hospital is recommended. If the person loses consciousness, has a seizure or is behaving abnormally, call 911 or take the person to the nearest emergency room as soon as possible.

Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat illness. This life-threatening illness requires immediate emergency care at a hospital. Body temperature is usually over 104 degrees. An individual is usually sweating but, may not as the illness advances. Other symptoms include: behavior changes, irritability, emotional instability, combativeness, and/or confusion. This can progress to seizures, loss of consciousness, and coma. It can cause permanent brain damage and if left untreated, death can occur. Individuals usually have organ damage to the kidneys, liver and muscles, some of which can be permanent.

Once heat stroke is recognized, actions should be taken to cool the person while transporting or awaiting transport to the nearest emergency center. Remove heavy clothing or gear, using cool towels on the skin and placing ice packs in the arm pits and groin area (where there are lots of blood vessels) is helpful. Even if the person regains consciousness, evaluation at an emergency center is necessary to avoid more damage to the brain and organs.

According to the CDC, heat-related illnesses killed an average of 380 people each year from 1999 to 2018. Prevention is the best defense against heat-related illnesses. Be aware of the weather and predicted temperatures when planning outdoor activities. If the temperature is going to be over 90 degrees rethink your plans and avoid strenuous activities. If you must continue, wear cool, loose clothing. Have plenty of cool drinks, cooling towels and ice packs on hand, and take frequent breaks in the shade. Also, be aware of those around you. A person suffering from heat stroke often does not recognize it.

If you see someone you suspect might be overheated, showing signs of confusion or acting strangely, take action! Check them out and help if they need it. Being cool-headed in a hot situation could save a life!
... See MoreSee Less

The heat is getting very DANGEROUS. If you don’t have a place to escape from the heat - you are welcome to come to a Rankin Physical Therapy / Fitness Center location to cool off in the AC and get some cold water to drink. Please be careful - the next couple days are going to be extremely hot!

It’s HOT – be careful out there

Mark Netherda

Summer is upon us! Besides the risk of painful sunburn – and skin cancer risks – the sun and heat also bring risks of heat-related illnesses.

Mild illnesses include simple dehydration (not enough water in your body from sweating), heat rash (also called prickly heat), temporary swelling of hands and feet, cramping of the large muscles, and heat related collapse or fainting.

While uncomfortable, these are rarely serious. This article focuses on the most serious of the heat related illnesses – heat exhaustion and life-threatening heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion occurs with strenuous exercise on hot days. It occurs most commonly in competing or practicing athletes and workers performing heavy labor. Signs of heat exhaustion include the inability to continue the activity, high body temperatures in the 101-104 degrees range and extreme weakness, often to the point of collapse. Sufferers usually sweat heavily, appear pale, have muscle and abdominal cramps, headaches, and sometimes with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. They do not have neurologic effects like abnormal behavior, seizures or altered consciousness.

Individuals should rest, laying down in a cool place (in shade or an air-conditioned setting). Any bulky clothing should be removed. Cool towels, showers or baths should be used as available to cool the person down. Chilled water or sports drinks should be given. If the person is vomiting or is too nauseated to drink, then evaluation at a hospital is recommended. If the person loses consciousness, has a seizure or is behaving abnormally, call 911 or take the person to the nearest emergency room as soon as possible.

Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat illness. This life-threatening illness requires immediate emergency care at a hospital. Body temperature is usually over 104 degrees. An individual is usually sweating but, may not as the illness advances. Other symptoms include: behavior changes, irritability, emotional instability, combativeness, and/or confusion. This can progress to seizures, loss of consciousness, and coma. It can cause permanent brain damage and if left untreated, death can occur. Individuals usually have organ damage to the kidneys, liver and muscles, some of which can be permanent.

Once heat stroke is recognized, actions should be taken to cool the person while transporting or awaiting transport to the nearest emergency center. Remove heavy clothing or gear, using cool towels on the skin and placing ice packs in the arm pits and groin area (where there are lots of blood vessels) is helpful. Even if the person regains consciousness, evaluation at an emergency center is necessary to avoid more damage to the brain and organs.

According to the CDC, heat-related illnesses killed an average of 380 people each year from 1999 to 2018. Prevention is the best defense against heat-related illnesses. Be aware of the weather and predicted temperatures when planning outdoor activities. If the temperature is going to be over 90 degrees rethink your plans and avoid strenuous activities. If you must continue, wear cool, loose clothing. Have plenty of cool drinks, cooling towels and ice packs on hand, and take frequent breaks in the shade. Also, be aware of those around you. A person suffering from heat stroke often does not recognize it.

If you see someone you suspect might be overheated, showing signs of confusion or acting strangely, take action! Check them out and help if they need it. Being cool-headed in a hot situation could save a life!

Comment on Facebook

Great idea for doing this Kelly

WONDERFUL IDEA FOR SOMEONE THAT NEEDS IT

Good job Kelley Rankin

Very nice to offer this ,god bless

Keeping the Neighbors cool...great job Kelley Rankin. 👍🏻😎

Such nice people.

GREAT Kelley Rankin!!

View more comments

Rankin Physical Therapy
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy
Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

Berkeley Springs, West Virginia

Morgan county youth pet show: go to www.morgancountyexpo.com or call 304 258 8400. ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

I would imagine so!

So cool!!!!!!❤️❤️❤️

Wouldn't you require rabies certificate for all mammals?

The following individuals and team have been selected as the newest members of the Berkeley Springs High School Athletic Hall of Fame Class of 2019.

Jeanne Hottle (standout women’s basketball player)

Charles Lutman (Standout football & track) Bi-State Conference, Shepherd Hall of Fame)

Mark Didawick D (1980’s standout basketball player, state tournament player, honorable mention all-state, coach at BSHS)

Mike Riggleman (State Wrestling Champion in 1994, 1995 State Wrestling Team Champion). Also standout football player.

John Mundey (standout cross country & track, state champion 1600, 3200, and 4x800 meter relay, 2018 US Army Reserve Soldier Of The Year And Best Warrior.

2011 Berkeley Springs Lady Indians Track Team (1st girls track state team champion) Members at the State Meet are as follows:

Head Coach: Dave Mundey
Assistant Coach: Dave Aberegg
Assistant Coach: John Rowland
Kayla Mundey
Sara Younker
Lacee Fulton
Michelle Williams
Jordan Bennett
Melissa Colby
Amanda Case
Toni Davison
Alicia McJilton
Leah Kidwell
Casey Solomon
Harlie Stotler
... See MoreSee Less

The following individuals and team have been selected as the newest members of the Berkeley Springs High School Athletic Hall of Fame Class of 2019.

Jeanne Hottle (standout women’s basketball player)

Charles Lutman (Standout football & track) Bi-State Conference, Shepherd Hall of Fame)

Mark Didawick D (1980’s standout basketball player, state tournament player, honorable mention all-state, coach at BSHS)

Mike Riggleman (State Wrestling Champion in 1994, 1995 State Wrestling Team Champion). Also standout football player.

John Mundey (standout cross country & track, state champion 1600, 3200, and 4x800 meter relay, 2018 US Army Reserve Soldier Of The Year And Best Warrior.

2011 Berkeley Springs Lady Indians Track Team (1st girls track state team champion) Members at the State Meet are as follows:

Head Coach: Dave Mundey
Assistant Coach: Dave Aberegg
Assistant Coach: John Rowland
Kayla Mundey
Sara Younker
Lacee Fulton
Michelle Williams 
Jordan Bennett
Melissa Colby
Amanda Case
Toni Davison
Alicia McJilton
Leah Kidwell
Casey Solomon
Harlie Stotler

Comment on Facebook

Congrats! Who decides the winners?

Congratulations Mark!

I played basketball with Mark for several years on BSHS team. Great athlete and person.

Health Benefits of Stretching

Most of us know that stretching before engaging in any form of exercise is important. But how important is stretching to your daily routine?

Increase circulation
Stretching increases blood flow to organs, muscles, and every part of your body, improving your health and well-being.

Prevent injury
Stretching allows your body to get nutrients to your bones and muscles, which helps to prevent injuries.

Boost endurance
Stretching helps to increase your stamina because it loosens up muscles throughout your entire body.

Increase energy
Stretching increases energy because it increases blood circulation.

Reduce body aches
Stretching helps to reduce body aches by getting nutrients to your muscles and relieve soreness.

Increase athletic performance
Stretching Increases athletic performance
Stretching improves athletic performance for so many reasons, including the fact that it gets nutrients to muscles and increases flexibility and range of motion.

Lift mood
Stretching even helps to lift your spirits. If you find yourself a little on the glum side, take a few minutes to stand up and stretch out your muscles.

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
#RankinPT
... See MoreSee Less

Health Benefits of Stretching

Most of us know that stretching before engaging in any form of exercise is important. But how important is stretching to your daily routine?

Increase circulation
Stretching increases blood flow to organs, muscles, and every part of your body, improving your health and well-being.

Prevent injury
Stretching allows your body to get nutrients to your bones and muscles, which helps to prevent injuries.

Boost endurance
Stretching helps to increase your stamina because it loosens up muscles throughout your entire body.

Increase energy
Stretching increases energy because it increases blood circulation.

Reduce body aches
Stretching helps to reduce body aches by getting nutrients to your muscles and relieve soreness.

Increase athletic performance
Stretching Increases athletic performance
Stretching improves athletic performance for so many reasons, including the fact that it gets nutrients to muscles and increases flexibility and range of motion. 

Lift mood
Stretching even helps to lift your spirits. If you find yourself a little on the glum side, take a few minutes to stand up and stretch out your muscles.

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
#RankinPT

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness

Berkeley Springs 304.258.1300
Hagerstown 301.790.9999
Hedgesville 304.754.6000
Inwood 304.229.1010
Martinsburg 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown 304.876.1000
Spring Mills 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness

Berkeley Springs          304.258.1300
Hagerstown                  301.790.9999
Hedgesville                   304.754.6000
Inwood                          304.229.1010
Martinsburg                  304.267.0866
Shepherdstown            304.876.1000
Spring Mills                   304.274.0123

The staff at Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness wish you and you family a Safe and Happy 4th of July. ... See MoreSee Less

The staff at Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness wish you and you family a Safe and Happy 4th of July.

Comment on Facebook

Happy belated 4th! 🇱🇷

Happy 4th!!

Happy 1st of July!! The beginning of a NEW month is the perfect time to start something special and new. Make July an amazing month. ... See MoreSee Less

Happy 1st of July!! The beginning of a NEW month is the perfect time to start something special and new. Make July an amazing month.

Rankin Physical Therapy:

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

It’s HOT – be careful out there

Mark Netherda

Summer is upon us! Besides the risk of painful sunburn – and skin cancer risks – the sun and heat also bring risks of heat-related illnesses.

Mild illnesses include simple dehydration (not enough water in your body from sweating), heat rash (also called prickly heat), temporary swelling of hands and feet, cramping of the large muscles, and heat related collapse or fainting.

While uncomfortable, these are rarely serious. This article focuses on the most serious of the heat related illnesses – heat exhaustion and life-threatening heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion occurs with strenuous exercise on hot days. It occurs most commonly in competing or practicing athletes and workers performing heavy labor. Signs of heat exhaustion include the inability to continue the activity, high body temperatures in the 101-104 degrees range and extreme weakness, often to the point of collapse. Sufferers usually sweat heavily, appear pale, have muscle and abdominal cramps, headaches, and sometimes with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. They do not have neurologic effects like abnormal behavior, seizures or altered consciousness.

Individuals should rest, laying down in a cool place (in shade or an air-conditioned setting). Any bulky clothing should be removed. Cool towels, showers or baths should be used as available to cool the person down. Chilled water or sports drinks should be given. If the person is vomiting or is too nauseated to drink, then evaluation at a hospital is recommended. If the person loses consciousness, has a seizure or is behaving abnormally, call 911 or take the person to the nearest emergency room as soon as possible.

Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat illness. This life-threatening illness requires immediate emergency care at a hospital. Body temperature is usually over 104 degrees. An individual is usually sweating but, may not as the illness advances. Other symptoms include: behavior changes, irritability, emotional instability, combativeness, and/or confusion. This can progress to seizures, loss of consciousness, and coma. It can cause permanent brain damage and if left untreated, death can occur. Individuals usually have organ damage to the kidneys, liver and muscles, some of which can be permanent.

Once heat stroke is recognized, actions should be taken to cool the person while transporting or awaiting transport to the nearest emergency center. Remove heavy clothing or gear, using cool towels on the skin and placing ice packs in the arm pits and groin area (where there are lots of blood vessels) is helpful. Even if the person regains consciousness, evaluation at an emergency center is necessary to avoid more damage to the brain and organs.

According to the CDC, heat-related illnesses killed an average of 380 people each year from 1999 to 2018. Prevention is the best defense against heat-related illnesses. Be aware of the weather and predicted temperatures when planning outdoor activities. If the temperature is going to be over 90 degrees rethink your plans and avoid strenuous activities. If you must continue, wear cool, loose clothing. Have plenty of cool drinks, cooling towels and ice packs on hand, and take frequent breaks in the shade. Also, be aware of those around you. A person suffering from heat stroke often does not recognize it.

If you see someone you suspect might be overheated, showing signs of confusion or acting strangely, take action! Check them out and help if they need it. Being cool-headed in a hot situation could save a life!
... See MoreSee Less

It’s HOT – be careful out there

Mark Netherda

Summer is upon us! Besides the risk of painful sunburn – and skin cancer risks – the sun and heat also bring risks of heat-related illnesses.

Mild illnesses include simple dehydration (not enough water in your body from sweating), heat rash (also called prickly heat), temporary swelling of hands and feet, cramping of the large muscles, and heat related collapse or fainting.

While uncomfortable, these are rarely serious. This article focuses on the most serious of the heat related illnesses – heat exhaustion and life-threatening heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion occurs with strenuous exercise on hot days. It occurs most commonly in competing or practicing athletes and workers performing heavy labor. Signs of heat exhaustion include the inability to continue the activity, high body temperatures in the 101-104 degrees range and extreme weakness, often to the point of collapse. Sufferers usually sweat heavily, appear pale, have muscle and abdominal cramps, headaches, and sometimes with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. They do not have neurologic effects like abnormal behavior, seizures or altered consciousness.

Individuals should rest, laying down in a cool place (in shade or an air-conditioned setting). Any bulky clothing should be removed. Cool towels, showers or baths should be used as available to cool the person down. Chilled water or sports drinks should be given. If the person is vomiting or is too nauseated to drink, then evaluation at a hospital is recommended. If the person loses consciousness, has a seizure or is behaving abnormally, call 911 or take the person to the nearest emergency room as soon as possible.

Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat illness. This life-threatening illness requires immediate emergency care at a hospital. Body temperature is usually over 104 degrees. An individual is usually sweating but, may not as the illness advances. Other symptoms include: behavior changes, irritability, emotional instability, combativeness, and/or confusion. This can progress to seizures, loss of consciousness, and coma. It can cause permanent brain damage and if left untreated, death can occur. Individuals usually have organ damage to the kidneys, liver and muscles, some of which can be permanent.

Once heat stroke is recognized, actions should be taken to cool the person while transporting or awaiting transport to the nearest emergency center. Remove heavy clothing or gear, using cool towels on the skin and placing ice packs in the arm pits and groin area (where there are lots of blood vessels) is helpful. Even if the person regains consciousness, evaluation at an emergency center is necessary to avoid more damage to the brain and organs.

According to the CDC, heat-related illnesses killed an average of 380 people each year from 1999 to 2018. Prevention is the best defense against heat-related illnesses. Be aware of the weather and predicted temperatures when planning outdoor activities. If the temperature is going to be over 90 degrees rethink your plans and avoid strenuous activities. If you must continue, wear cool, loose clothing. Have plenty of cool drinks, cooling towels and ice packs on hand, and take frequent breaks in the shade. Also, be aware of those around you. A person suffering from heat stroke often does not recognize it.

If you see someone you suspect might be overheated, showing signs of confusion or acting strangely, take action! Check them out and help if they need it. Being cool-headed in a hot situation could save a life!

Health Benefits of Stretching

Most of us know that stretching before engaging in any form of exercise is important. But how important is stretching to your daily routine?

Increase circulation
Stretching increases blood flow to organs, muscles, and every part of your body, improving your health and well-being.

Prevent injury
Stretching allows your body to get nutrients to your bones and muscles, which helps to prevent injuries.

Boost endurance
Stretching helps to increase your stamina because it loosens up muscles throughout your entire body.

Increase energy
Stretching increases energy because it increases blood circulation.

Reduce body aches
Stretching helps to reduce body aches by getting nutrients to your muscles and relieve soreness.

Increase athletic performance
Stretching Increases athletic performance
Stretching improves athletic performance for so many reasons, including the fact that it gets nutrients to muscles and increases flexibility and range of motion.

Lift mood
Stretching even helps to lift your spirits. If you find yourself a little on the glum side, take a few minutes to stand up and stretch out your muscles.

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
#RankinPT
... See MoreSee Less

Health Benefits of Stretching

Most of us know that stretching before engaging in any form of exercise is important. But how important is stretching to your daily routine?

Increase circulation
Stretching increases blood flow to organs, muscles, and every part of your body, improving your health and well-being.

Prevent injury
Stretching allows your body to get nutrients to your bones and muscles, which helps to prevent injuries.

Boost endurance
Stretching helps to increase your stamina because it loosens up muscles throughout your entire body.

Increase energy
Stretching increases energy because it increases blood circulation.

Reduce body aches
Stretching helps to reduce body aches by getting nutrients to your muscles and relieve soreness.

Increase athletic performance
Stretching Increases athletic performance
Stretching improves athletic performance for so many reasons, including the fact that it gets nutrients to muscles and increases flexibility and range of motion. 

Lift mood
Stretching even helps to lift your spirits. If you find yourself a little on the glum side, take a few minutes to stand up and stretch out your muscles.

Berkeley Springs - 304.258.1300
Hagerstown - 301.790.9999
Hedgesville - 304.754.6000
Inwood - 304.229.1010
Martinsburg - 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown - 304.876.1000
Spring Mills - 304.274.0123
#RankinPT

It’s HOT – be careful out there

Mark Netherda

Summer is upon us! Besides the risk of painful sunburn – and skin cancer risks – the sun and heat also bring risks of heat-related illnesses.

Mild illnesses include simple dehydration (not enough water in your body from sweating), heat rash (also called prickly heat), temporary swelling of hands and feet, cramping of the large muscles, and heat related collapse or fainting.

While uncomfortable, these are rarely serious. This article focuses on the most serious of the heat related illnesses – heat exhaustion and life-threatening heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion occurs with strenuous exercise on hot days. It occurs most commonly in competing or practicing athletes and workers performing heavy labor. Signs of heat exhaustion include the inability to continue the activity, high body temperatures in the 101-104 degrees range and extreme weakness, often to the point of collapse. Sufferers usually sweat heavily, appear pale, have muscle and abdominal cramps, headaches, and sometimes with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. They do not have neurologic effects like abnormal behavior, seizures or altered consciousness.

Individuals should rest, laying down in a cool place (in shade or an air-conditioned setting). Any bulky clothing should be removed. Cool towels, showers or baths should be used as available to cool the person down. Chilled water or sports drinks should be given. If the person is vomiting or is too nauseated to drink, then evaluation at a hospital is recommended. If the person loses consciousness, has a seizure or is behaving abnormally, call 911 or take the person to the nearest emergency room as soon as possible.

Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat illness. This life-threatening illness requires immediate emergency care at a hospital. Body temperature is usually over 104 degrees. An individual is usually sweating but, may not as the illness advances. Other symptoms include: behavior changes, irritability, emotional instability, combativeness, and/or confusion. This can progress to seizures, loss of consciousness, and coma. It can cause permanent brain damage and if left untreated, death can occur. Individuals usually have organ damage to the kidneys, liver and muscles, some of which can be permanent.

Once heat stroke is recognized, actions should be taken to cool the person while transporting or awaiting transport to the nearest emergency center. Remove heavy clothing or gear, using cool towels on the skin and placing ice packs in the arm pits and groin area (where there are lots of blood vessels) is helpful. Even if the person regains consciousness, evaluation at an emergency center is necessary to avoid more damage to the brain and organs.

According to the CDC, heat-related illnesses killed an average of 380 people each year from 1999 to 2018. Prevention is the best defense against heat-related illnesses. Be aware of the weather and predicted temperatures when planning outdoor activities. If the temperature is going to be over 90 degrees rethink your plans and avoid strenuous activities. If you must continue, wear cool, loose clothing. Have plenty of cool drinks, cooling towels and ice packs on hand, and take frequent breaks in the shade. Also, be aware of those around you. A person suffering from heat stroke often does not recognize it.

If you see someone you suspect might be overheated, showing signs of confusion or acting strangely, take action! Check them out and help if they need it. Being cool-headed in a hot situation could save a life!
... See MoreSee Less

It’s HOT – be careful out there

Mark Netherda

Summer is upon us! Besides the risk of painful sunburn – and skin cancer risks – the sun and heat also bring risks of heat-related illnesses.

Mild illnesses include simple dehydration (not enough water in your body from sweating), heat rash (also called prickly heat), temporary swelling of hands and feet, cramping of the large muscles, and heat related collapse or fainting.

While uncomfortable, these are rarely serious. This article focuses on the most serious of the heat related illnesses – heat exhaustion and life-threatening heat stroke.

Heat exhaustion occurs with strenuous exercise on hot days. It occurs most commonly in competing or practicing athletes and workers performing heavy labor. Signs of heat exhaustion include the inability to continue the activity, high body temperatures in the 101-104 degrees range and extreme weakness, often to the point of collapse. Sufferers usually sweat heavily, appear pale, have muscle and abdominal cramps, headaches, and sometimes with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. They do not have neurologic effects like abnormal behavior, seizures or altered consciousness.

Individuals should rest, laying down in a cool place (in shade or an air-conditioned setting). Any bulky clothing should be removed. Cool towels, showers or baths should be used as available to cool the person down. Chilled water or sports drinks should be given. If the person is vomiting or is too nauseated to drink, then evaluation at a hospital is recommended. If the person loses consciousness, has a seizure or is behaving abnormally, call 911 or take the person to the nearest emergency room as soon as possible.

Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat illness. This life-threatening illness requires immediate emergency care at a hospital. Body temperature is usually over 104 degrees. An individual is usually sweating but, may not as the illness advances. Other symptoms include: behavior changes, irritability, emotional instability, combativeness, and/or confusion. This can progress to seizures, loss of consciousness, and coma. It can cause permanent brain damage and if left untreated, death can occur. Individuals usually have organ damage to the kidneys, liver and muscles, some of which can be permanent.

Once heat stroke is recognized, actions should be taken to cool the person while transporting or awaiting transport to the nearest emergency center. Remove heavy clothing or gear, using cool towels on the skin and placing ice packs in the arm pits and groin area (where there are lots of blood vessels) is helpful. Even if the person regains consciousness, evaluation at an emergency center is necessary to avoid more damage to the brain and organs.

According to the CDC, heat-related illnesses killed an average of 380 people each year from 1999 to 2018. Prevention is the best defense against heat-related illnesses. Be aware of the weather and predicted temperatures when planning outdoor activities. If the temperature is going to be over 90 degrees rethink your plans and avoid strenuous activities. If you must continue, wear cool, loose clothing. Have plenty of cool drinks, cooling towels and ice packs on hand, and take frequent breaks in the shade. Also, be aware of those around you. A person suffering from heat stroke often does not recognize it.

If you see someone you suspect might be overheated, showing signs of confusion or acting strangely, take action! Check them out and help if they need it. Being cool-headed in a hot situation could save a life!

At Rankin Physical Therapy we bring the best physical therapists together to help you with your rehabilitation needs. We offer the finest professional team with diverse experiences and interests combined with enthusiasm and compassion. Together, we strive to create a positive atmosphere from the first time you walk in our door. You can have confidence in our ability to help you with your therapy needs and to get you back to doing the activities you love. ... See MoreSee Less

At Rankin Physical Therapy we bring the best physical therapists together to help you with your rehabilitation needs. We offer the finest professional team with diverse experiences and interests combined with enthusiasm and compassion. Together, we strive to create a positive atmosphere from the first time you walk in our door. You can have confidence in our ability to help you with your therapy needs and to get you back to doing the activities you love.

Make it a great summer! ... See MoreSee Less

Make it a great summer!

Happy 156th Birthday West Virginia ... See MoreSee Less

Happy 156th Birthday West Virginia

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Beautiful 👍

Love it here!

Some beautiful pics! West Virginia sure is a state of beauty! 💕

BEAUTIFUL 👏💕👍

Love it here!

Nice place to visit but I wouldn't want to live there

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Rankin Physical Therapy and Fitness Center would like to wish a Happy Father’s Day to all of the wonderful Dads out there. ... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy and Fitness Center would like to wish a Happy Father’s Day to all of the wonderful Dads out there.

Thank you !

Hi all we have recently purchased land in Great Cacapon, it was previously used for hay and cattle, we are looking for someone to use it for hay, there are 2 pastures 1 is large and 1 is medium. All we ask is for the person farming the hay to get us farm land real estate taxes.

If interested please call or text 856-466-2389
... See MoreSee Less

Rankin Physical Therapy & Fitness
Berkeley Springs 304.258.1300
Hagerstown 301.790.9999
Hedgesville 304.754.6000
Inwood 304.229.1010
Martinsburg 304.267.0866
Shepherdstown 304.876.1000
Spring Mills 304.274.0123
... See MoreSee Less

Very kind words from one of our patients this morning. Thanks for starting my Monday off right Lee Ann. “I fell, fractured my shoulder and totally severed my rotator cuff. I had surgical repair but without Rankin Physical Therapy, I wouldn’t be able to do anything with my arm. They worked with me until I achieved full range of motion and the ability to lift. I am totally pain-free and my arm and shoulder function better than they did before my accident. I can’t recommend the therapists and the therapy aides enough. They are all awesome as therapists and as human beings.” ... See MoreSee Less

Very kind words from one of our patients this morning. Thanks for starting my Monday off right Lee Ann.   “I fell, fractured my shoulder and totally severed my rotator cuff. I had surgical repair but without Rankin Physical Therapy, I wouldn’t be able to do anything with my arm. They worked with me until I achieved full range of motion and the ability to lift. I am totally pain-free and my arm and shoulder function better than they did before my accident. I can’t recommend the therapists and the therapy aides enough. They are all awesome as therapists and as human beings.”

Happy National Doughnut Day WV ... See MoreSee Less

Happy National Doughnut Day WV

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This was the only thing missing on the Chocolate Walk!